Kellyanne Conway's Husband Says Trump Foundation Investigation Should Be Referred to U.S. Attorney's Office

George Conway, the husband of counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway, took aim at President Donald Trump again Sunday, this time over the New York Attorney General’s lawsuit that alleged the Trump foundation violated campaign finance laws.

“These are obviously very serious allegations, and they should be referred to the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York,” Conway tweeted in reference to the lawsuit.

Barbara Underwood, the New York Attorney General filed a lawsuit against President Trump and his three eldest children on Thursday alleging "illegal conduct" at the president's personal charity.

Trump is accused of using the nonprofit for personal business purposes to decorate one of his golf clubs and host a multimillion dollar giveaway during his 2016 campaign for president, according to The Washington Post.

Despite his wife’s position as counselor to the president, Conway has been a vocal critic of President Trump and his policies. On Monday, he posted a blog titled “The Terrible Arguments Against the Constitutionality of the Mueller Investigation” where he pushed back on Trump’s claim that the appointment of Robert Mueller to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election was unconstitutional.

“It isn’t very surprising to see the president tweet a meritless legal position, because, as a non-lawyer, he wouldn’t know the difference between a good one and a bad one,” he wrote. “Such a lack of rigor, sadly, has been a disturbing trend in much of the politically charged public discourse about the law lately, and one that lawyers—regardless of their politics—owe a duty to abjure.”

Conway tweeted in March that is was “flabbergasting” that Trump’s lawyers discussed pardons for aides because of what they might tell special counsel Robert Mueller.

The same day, Conway shared a tweet that said Trump “says one thing” then “does the opposite.”

“This is why officials are so hesitant to speak for Trump. He says one thing, then does the opposite. He says he’s happy with McMaster, they defend him, then he fires him a week later. He says he’ll sign the bill, they publicly say as much, then he tweets he's considering a veto,” the tweet from a CNN reporter said.

In May, Conway cited a Federal Election Commission law on Twitter after the revelation the Trump had repaid his personal lawyer the money given to adult film star Stormy Daniels for her silence about a sexual encounter from 2006.

Last year, after Conway tweeted that Trump’s rhetoric could undermine his agenda, he clarified continues to  “VERY, VERY STRONGLY support POTUS, his Admin, policies…”

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