Man Who Called 911 on Black Golfers: 'Other Than Her Mouth, There's Not Any Weapons'

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A bag of golf clubs sits on the course while a golfer takes a swing in the background. In a separate incident, the man who called the police on a group of black women playing golf at Grandview Golf Club in Pennsylvania in April told the dispatcher that the women were not carrying any weapons "other than her mouth." Getty Images

The man who called police on a group of black women playing golf at a Pennsylvania golf club replied to the 911 dispatcher that the women were not carrying weapons "other than her mouth."

In newly released 911 calls obtained by the York Daily Record, former York County Commissioner Steve Chronister called the police on April 21 at around 11:30 a.m. and said that five black women were stalling other golfers from playing at the Grandview Golf Club in Dover Township, Pennsylvania. The 911 dispatcher asked if the women were carrying weapons.

"It's even worse than that, but anyway I can't ..." Chronister said.

When the dispatcher asked again to clarify that the women did not have any weapons on them, Chronister replied "no" several times.

"No," Chronister said. "Other than her mouth, there's not any weapons."

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A bag of golf clubs sits on the course while a young Asian female golfer takes a swing in the background. The man who called the police on a group of black women playing golf at Grandview Golf Club in Pennsylvania in April told the dispatcher that the women were not carrying any weapons "other than her mouth." Getty Images

Sandra Thompson, head of the NAACP of York County and an attorney, and four friends—Myneca Ojo, Sandra Harrison, Carolyn Dow and Karen Crosby—gained national attention after a video went viral of a confrontation between Chronister's group and Thompson's group.

Thompson and her friends were asked to leave the golf club because they did not "keep up the pace of the play" while they were at the second hole.

"I was approached by Steve Chronister, and he said, 'I'm one of the owners and you need to keep up the pace of play," Crosby previously told the York Daily Record. "To me, that was a gross misrepresentation of who he was."

During the 911 call, Chronister, who is also the father of the club's co-owner Jordan Chronister, told the dispatcher he knew the woman and said the group of golfers "don't want to abide by the rules."

"She ran for judge. She's an attorney. She knows it all," Chronister told the dispatcher. "She totally thinks we're being racist. We're not being racist. We're being golf course management that has to have play moving a certain way."

Thompson previously told the York Daily Record that the group did not agree with them that they were playing slowly. The group, known as the "Sisters on the Fairway" say they know golfing etiquette and rules because they have played on at several different golf clubs across the country.

The golf club issued an apology but then released another statement on April 23.

"Grandview currently has 2400 members. In the past players who have not followed the rules, specifically pace of play, have voluntarily left at our request as our scorecard states. In this instance, the members refused to leave so we called police to ensure an amicable result. The members did skip holes and took an extended break after the 9th hole," the statement read. "We spoke with them once about pace of play and then spoke with them a second time. During the second conversation we asked members to leave as per our policy noted on the scorecard, voices escalated, and police were called to ensure an amicable resolution."