GOP Congressman Says He's 'Embarrassed' by Republican Election Objections

A Republican congressman said he was "embarrassed" by members of his own party objecting to the presidential election results after a mob of pro-Trump protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) said some of his fellow GOP lawmakers were focused on "political points for fame" and had "failed to rise" to the moment as several prominent figures on Capitol Hill condemned the protesters who stormed Congress, calling for them to be prosecuted under the fullest extent of the law.

Appearing on the House floor, the Republican congressman was also applauded by Democrats across the aisle as hit out at his colleagues for making "shockingly tone-deaf" remarks as they objected to Pennsylvania's election results in a failed bid to overturn the election.

Posting on social media, Rep. Kinzinger said: "I'm embarrassed by some of my Republican colleagues on the floor. They have defaulted to political points for fame and have failed to rise to this moment."

Rep. Adam Kinzinger
Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) said he was "embarrassed" by GOP objections to the 2020 election results. Kevin Dietsch-Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Delivering a speech on the floor of the House chamber later in the evening, he called protesters who breached Congress a "mob" and likened the events of the day to that of a "banana republic" as he railed against the spreading of fear and misinformation.

"Some have shown that if conspiracies are repeated enough, they become facts and they aren't disputed," the Republican said. "Even here in this chamber after the events today, some speeches have been shockingly tone-deaf. I've seen people applaud cheap political lines that are embarrassing."

The congressman added that people had been lied and noted that President-elect Joe Biden had won the election as he argued that the oath lawmakers swore to uphold felt "like a prop" for some.

"For some out there, this isn't about making a statement for the betterment of our country. It's about avoiding the pain for leveling with the people and telling them the truth: the emperor has no clothes," Rep. Kinzinger added. "I know many are disappointed in the result, but what legacy are we leaving?"

Lawmakers certified Biden's election victory in the late hours of Wednesday night after Republican objections and protesters delayed the greenlighting of the results—a process that usually passes without fanfare.

The president-elect's inauguration is set to take place on January 20, despite fears about the events security in the wake of Wednesday's chaotic scenes at the U.S. Capitol, which led to four deaths and several arrests.

After the mob of demonstrators was removed from Congress, Vice President Mike Pence, who broke with President Donald Trump on certification of the election, hit out at the protesters. "To those who wreaked havoc in our Capitol today, you did not win," he tweeted. "Violence never wins. Freedom wins. And this is still the People's House."

In the wake of repeated refusals to concede the election, and baseless claims that he was cheated out of victory by voter fraud, President Trump also released a statement in the early hours of Thursday.

"Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election, and the facts bear me out, nevertheless there will be an orderly transition on January 20th," he said. "I have always said we would continue our fight to ensure that only legal votes were counted. While this represents the end of the greatest first term in presidential history, it's only the beginning of our fight to Make America Great Again"