GOP Senator Debunks Infrastructure Misinformation: 'Critical Race Theory Is Not in This Bill'

Republican Senator Bill Cassidy has debunked misinformation about the roughly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill that cleared a key procedural hurdle on Saturday, with 18 Senate Republicans voting with Democrats to advance the deal in a rare weekend session.

The Senate voted 67-27 Saturday afternoon to advance the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, a 2,702-page bill crafted by a bipartisan group of negotiators alongside President Joe Biden. But the bill soon stalled out as a few Senate Republicans, including Bill Hagerty of Tennessee, refused to allow a speedy passage of the package.

Cassidy, a lead GOP negotiator, took to Twitter to dispel misinformation circulating online and discourage those seeking to "play politics" with the legislation.

"Critical Race Theory is not in this bill, never has been. Equity is not a catch-phrase for CRT. Language in this bill DOES NOT change current anti-discrimination laws at all," he tweeted.

Third, Critical Race Theory is not in this bill, never has been. Equity is not a catch-phrase for CRT. Language in this bill DOES NOT change current anti-discrimination laws at all. (7/9)

— U.S. Senator Bill Cassidy, M.D. (@SenBillCassidy) August 7, 2021

Among the major investments, the bipartisan package provides $110,000 billion for roads and highways, $65 billion for broadband development, $55 billion for water infrastructure, $40 billion for bridges, $25 billion for airport projects, $23 billion for state water and $15 billion to move lead service lines.

"This bill is fully paid for. We always said [the Congressional Budget Office] wouldn't give us credit for half of our pay-fors. We repurpose $53B in unused Unemployment Insurance, for example. Congress already allocated the money but CBO doesn't acknowledge it. It's a fiscally responsible bill," the Louisiana senator tweeted.

Finally, Cassidy noted that there's no mileage tax in this bill. "What you are hearing is about a study to figure out if such a fee would even be possible for issues like electric cars driving on our streets without paying the gas tax like the rest of us. It does not implement a new tax," he tweeted.

Senators have convened for a second consecutive weekend to work on passing the first of Biden's two infrastructure bills. Lawmakers were unable to reach an agreement Saturday on holding votes to cement the final amendments, and will meet again Sunday to continue procedural votes.

Once the bill passes the Senate, it will head to the House where its fate is foggy. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said last month that the lower chamber won't vote on the bipartisan package without a larger, Democrat-only plan.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has pushed Democrats to complete the budget outline for the $3.5 trillion antipoverty and climate bill over the next week. "The Senate will stay in session until we finish our work. It's up to my Republican colleagues how long it takes," he said.

GOP senator Bill Cassidy infrastructure bill misinformation
U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) leaves after a Senate Republican luncheon at the U.S. Capitol on July 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images