Hawaii Missile Phone Message Terrifies State But Is False, Officials Say

Update | A message warning Hawaii residents of an incoming missile sent Saturday directly to their phones was incorrect but officials said there is no current threat to the state.

The false message set off some initial panic over Twitter as the United States and North Korea have exchanged ominous threats of nuclear war. Hawaii is one of the closest potential targets for North leader Kim Jong Un.

The emergency alert message stated: "Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill."

Minutes later, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) said she had confirmed there was no missile.

"HAWAII - THIS IS A FALSE ALARM. THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE TO HAWAII. I HAVE CONFIRMED WITH OFFICIALS THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE," Gabbard tweeted Saturday.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency also tweeted: "NO missile threat to Hawaii."

And Hawaii Gov. David Age also confirmed there was no missile threat.

However, it remains unclear as to why the message was sent at all.

The U.S. Pacific Comman said the message was sent in error.

"USPACOM has detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii. Earlier message was sent in error. State of Hawaii will send out a correction message as soon as possible," Dave Benham, spokesman for U.S. Pacific Command, said in a statement.

The correction message has since been sent out.

The state had started a preparedness plan in July should the North fire a missile. It included evacuation drills for schools and the regular testing of an emergency siren.

Last month, the siren specifically meant for a nuclear threat was added.

Kim has previously issued threats of using his military's missiles on U.S. cities, while Trump has also suggested that talks would be pointless with a regime that only "understands one thing."

Reports also surfaced this week indicating the North may be preparing for the seventh nuclear test in the history of its program.

Still, tensions declined recently after the North agreed to meet and hold talks with South Korea next week, the first such talks in more than two years.

This story was updated to include a statement from U.S. Pacific Command.

Hawaii Missile Phone Message Terrifies State But Is False, Officials Say | U.S.