Weather: 'Heat Related Illness' Warning as Temperatures Rise to 107 Degrees

Extreme weather has been prevalent lately across parts of the United States. From thunderstorms to heatwaves, states, particularly in the South and West, are being hard hit.

The National Weather Service (NWS), has issued excessive heat warnings for parts of Texas and Arizona.

In the warnings, it explains how the "extreme heat and humidity will significantly increase the potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities."

Monday, July 11, Weather Forecast

Texas

  • Fort Worth area - Temperatures are expected to reach 107 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Tuesday, July 12 at 9 p.m CDT.
  • San Antonio area - Temperatures are expected to reach 110 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Tuesday, July 12 at 7 p.m CDT.
  • San Angelo area - Temperatures are expected to reach 109 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Tuesday, July 12 at 8 p.m CDT.
  • Houston/Galveston area - Temperatures are expected to reach 112 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Monday, July 11 at 8 p.m CDT.

Arizona

  • Tucson area - Temperatures are expected to reach 114 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Monday, July 11 at 8 p.m MST.
  • Phoenix area - Temperatures are expected to reach 115 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Monday, July 11 at 8 p.m PDT.
  • Flagstaff area - Temperatures are expected to reach over 110 degrees, the excessive heat warning is in place until Monday, July 11 at 6 p.m MST.
California wildfire aftermath
Charred hillside following wildfires in Jackson, California. Taken on July 6, 2022. Getty Images

What are heat-related illnesses?

The two main illnesses are heatstroke and heat exhaustion. We've listed the symptoms of both below:

Heatstroke, according to Mayo Clinic:

  • High body temperature. A core body temperature of 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 Celsius) or higher, obtained with a rectal thermometer, is the main sign of heatstroke.
  • Altered mental state or behavior. Confusion, agitation, slurred speech, irritability, delirium, seizures and coma can all result from heatstroke.
  • Alteration in sweating. In heatstroke brought on by hot weather, your skin will feel hot and dry to the touch. However, in heatstroke brought on by strenuous exercise, your skin may feel dry or slightly moist.
  • Nausea and vomiting. You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit.
  • Flushed skin. Your skin may turn red as your body temperature increases.
  • Rapid breathing. Your breathing may become rapid and shallow.
  • Racing heart rate. Your pulse may significantly increase because heat stress places a tremendous burden on your heart to help cool your body.
  • Headache. Your head may throb.

Heat exhaustion, according to Mayo Clinic:

  • Cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat
  • Heavy sweating
  • Faintness
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Weak, rapid pulse
  • Low blood pressure upon standing
  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea
  • Headache

You can avoid and prevent these illnesses by following these guidelines, set out by the NWS:

  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors.
  • Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
    under any circumstances.
  • Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside.
  • When possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
  • Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when possible.
  • To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments.
  • Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.