Heatwave: Where the Heat Dome Will Land in the U.S.

In the U.S., excessively high temperatures have plagued the Pacific Northwest, with deaths reported in Oregon and Washington.

Temperatures are expected to remain high, while excessive rain and the risk of flash flooding is also expected as August begins.

Where High Temperatures Are Expected In The U.S.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Center, early August's predictions show the extreme high temperatures in some areas will pause.

The Lower Mississippi Valley and Southern Great Plains will get a break from these temperatures, however the pattern is expected to move over to the west of the country and the Northern Great Plains.

Having said that, much of the U.S. will experience higher-than-average temperatures over the coming days, due to the heat dome.

The NOAA's Ocean Service describes a heat dome as when the rising sea temperatures get caught in a jet stream as they approach land, meaning there is a rise in humidity as well as temperature.

In a tweet from the NOAA, the organization said: "Besides excessive heat, the dome of high pressure aloft will trap smoke from active wildfire areas in the West, shown moving clockwise around the high pressure in this forecast of near-surface smoke concentrations.

"Numerous Air Quality Alerts dot the region to begin the week. Farther north, note another plume of higher smoke concentrations blowing from Canada into New England.

"The jet stream along the periphery of the upper ridge in Canada is blowing smoke from active fire areas in Manitoba & Ontario east, roughly 1200 miles away."

Besides excessive heat, the dome of high pressure aloft will trap smoke from active wildfire areas in the West, shown moving clockwise around the high pressure in this forecast of near-surface smoke concentrations. Numerous Air Quality Alerts dot the region to begin the week. pic.twitter.com/nyWRzKDSe9

— NWS Weather Prediction Center (@NWSWPC) July 26, 2021

There is still a high risk of a heatwave over the northwestern areas of the contiguous U.S. due to wildfires which continue to burn there.

At the moment, the National Interagency Fire Center reports six wildfires covering 542,788 acres of woodland in Oregon, and the same number of fires across 332,838 acres in California, though two of these are contained.

Currently, 1,542,180 acres of the U.S. are affected by active large fires, though not all of these are necessarily wildfires.

The NOAA predicts this excessive heat from wildfires could continue across California, the Pacific Northwest and the Northern Rockies.

At the moment, there is severe drought affecting parts of the west of the U.S., though the final week of July is expected to see rainfall and even thunderstorms across the country.

Over the final days of July, rainfall is expected to increase in Oregon and some parts of California.

New Mexico has already seen some flash flooding, which is also expected to affect areas of Georgia and South Carolina before moving northwards to parts of Wisconsin and Illinois.

Heavy rain will also affect Massachusetts in the east of the country.

According to Scientific American, there have been 117 deaths recorded in relation to the heatwave in the Pacific Northwest, though these numbers are only those whose deaths are directly associated with the heat.

2021 has seen a number of extreme weather events take place across the world. Flooding in Germany and Belgium left thousands affected, while a typhoon followed historic flooding in China.

Bootleg wildfire in Oregon
A firefighter putting out hot spots of the Bootleg Fire north of Bly, Oregon on July 17, 2021. More than 2,100 firefighters were trying to contain the Bootleg Fire raging in southern Oregon, near the border with California. Payton Bruni/AFP/Getty Images