A Big Breakfast May Be Key To Weight Loss, Study Finds

03-19-EGGS
This breakfast in Israel is an example of a high energy morning meal. David Silverman/Getty Images

Updated | As if you needed another reason to treat yourself in the morning, another study has determined that high energy breakfasts are great for weight loss. In addition to promoting weight loss, researchers found energy-rich meals also improve diabetes symptoms.

Researchers in Israel studied 11 women and 18 men with both obesity and type 2 diabetes; the patients were being treated with insulin and were an average age of 69 years old. The patients were split into two groups: the first group was assigned to eat a large energy-rich breakfast, medium lunch and small dinner, while the other group ate six small meals throughout the day. The patients' glucose levels and weight was also monitored over the course of two weeks.

Related: Diabetes Has Five Distinct Types, Not Two: Study

Results showed that the three meal diet plan with the high-energy breakfast was more effective for weight loss among the obese and type 2 diabetes patients than the six small meals. Over the course of the study, the high-energy group lost an average of 11 pounds while the group that eating six small meals lost only 3 pounds. Hunger and cravings for carbohydrates decreased in the high energy breakfast group, but increased in the six meals a day group.

In addition, the high-energy breakfast group needed significantly less insulin, while the six meals a day group needed more insulin than average.

03-19-EGGS
This breakfast in Israel is an example of a high energy morning meal. David Silverman/Getty Images

Related: Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-Calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

According to the American Diabetes Association, type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease and occurs when the body is "insulin resistant," or does not use insulin properly. If left untreated this can cause eye, kidney, nerve and heart problems. This condition can normally be treated with lifestyle changes, pill, and insulin shots.

These results, which were presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, suggest that proper food timing and frequency could play a role in glucose and weight control for diabetic patients.

Although was conducted on obese diabetic patients, lead researcher Daniela Jakubowicz told Newsweek that the results are "totally applicable for obese non-diabetic or pre-diabetic individuals."

Dr. David Friedman, a clinical nutritionist, said a big breakfast followed by smaller meals can aid in weight loss. "You are much better off feeding your body a high energy, healthy, power packed meal in the morning and ramping down with the other two meals of the day," Friedman told Newsweek.

He suggests dieters stay away from white flour and refined sugar in the morning and instead opt for more filling foods. Some suggestions include three scrambled eggs with spinach and avocado, organic multigrain oatmeal, or even some buckwheat pancakes with yacon syrup, a natural sweetener.

This story has been updated to reflect additional reporting.

A Big Breakfast May Be Key To Weight Loss, Study Finds | Tech & Science