Hurricane Ida Creates Massive Wall of Violent Sideways Rain in Video

As Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana, a large wall of rain was captured on video in New Orleans.

In a video posted to Twitter by Jeff Nowak of WWL Radio in New Orleans, strong wind can be seen pushing the precipitation in one direction, creating a wall of rain.

"Y'all ... I don't even know what wizardry this is but it's terrifying. #HurricaneIda," Nowak wrote in the tweet.

Y’all … I don’t even know what wizardry this is but it’s terrifying. #HurricaneIda

🎥 Scott Alexander in the New Orleans CBD pic.twitter.com/Yy51B2ECn3

— Jeff Nowak (@Jeff_Nowak) August 29, 2021

In response to the video, Twitter user Matthew Chauvin wrote, "Ah yes. The wind cause the rain to move a such a rapid speed sideways that a boundary layer is formed on the building causing it to stick and create a sort of 'wall of rain.'"

Ah yes. The wind cause the rain to move a such a rapid speed sideways that a boundary layer is formed on the building causing it to stick and create a sort of “wall of rain” https://t.co/drJmIyMKr1

— Matthew Chauvin (@MattChauvin2) August 30, 2021

On Sunday at about 11:55 a.m. CT, Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm. The National Hurricane Center said in an update on Sunday that "life-threatening storm surge" and "wind damage" were expected in areas across Louisiana.

In an update on Monday morning, the National Hurricane Center said that Ida was downgraded to a tropical storm but that dangerous storm surge and strong winds were still expected.

"Ida will continue to produce heavy rainfall tonight through Tuesday morning across portions of southeast Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, and southwestern Alabama resulting in considerable to life-threatening flash and urban flooding and significant riverine flooding impacts," the update said.

"As Ida moves inland, considerable flooding impacts are possible across portions of the Lower Mississippi Valley, Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley, Central and Southern Appalachians, and Mid-Atlantic through Wednesday."

As Hurricane Ida made landfall in the Gulf Coast area, several other pictures and videos were posted across social media showing the damage the storm caused.

Twitter user Johnston von Springer of WBRZ news in Baton Rouge shared a video of the wind gusts seen from Ida.

"Wind gusts have been coming and going here in downtown Baton Rouge," the tweet said.

Wind gusts have been coming and going here in downtown Baton Rouge #Ida pic.twitter.com/CogtpHHtQ2

— Johnston von Springer (@johnstonvon) August 30, 2021

Twitter user Timboi shared pictures of the flooding caused by Hurricane Ida, with numerous cars seen partially submerged in the water.

"Right now we are in a hotel in laplace bc st charles did a mandatory evacuation and well we arent doing good. The hotel has a back up generator but its flooding really bad," the tweet said.

Right now we are in a hotel in laplace bc st charles did a mandatory evacuation and well we arent doing good. The hotel has a back up generator but its flooding really bad. pic.twitter.com/3aIZNsXHhE

— Timboi (@longpig_tim) August 30, 2021

The National Weather Service in New Orleans issued several flash flood advisories as Hurricane Ida made landfall and over 1 million were without power in Louisiana, according to PowerOutage US.

President Joe Biden approved a disaster declaration in Louisiana as Ida made landfall.

"As soon as the storm passes...we're gonna put the country's full might behind the rescue and recovery. And I mean that," he said Sunday while visiting the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) headquarters.

"I've been around for a lot of hurricanes. I'm no expert, but I've been around for a lot of hurricanes and I don't think we've ever had as much preparation, long-term preparation with a levee system and preparation here."

Hurricane Ida
As Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana, it created a wall of violent sideways rain seen in a video. Above, a truck is seen in heavy winds and rain from hurricane Ida in Bourg, Louisiana, on August 29, 2021. Mark Felix/Getty