Internet Backs Woman Who Sold 'Heirloom' Engagement Ring to Pay Canceled Wedding Costs

The internet has rallied behind a woman who claimed in a now-viral post that she sold her engagement ring to cover the costs of her canceled wedding.

Posting to Reddit's "Am I The A**hole" forum on Thursday under the username u/ISoldAFamilyHeirloom, the woman explained that the ring was an heirloom that originally belonged to her ex-fiancé's great-grandmother.

So far, the post has racked up more than 14,000 upvotes and over 2,300 comments.

The woman told Redditors that she called off her wedding last week when she learned that her now-ex-fiancé, Mason, had cheated on her.

"Because it's so close to our wedding date...I barely managed to get any money back as it's mostly non-refundable so, in total, I've lost $20,000," she wrote.

She asked Mason to help cover some of the costs but he refused. So, she presented Mason with an ultimatum.

"I told him that if he didn't agree to help pay it off [I wanted a lawyer involved] that I would sell the ring," she recalled. According to her post, the ring was worth $25,000.

"He didn't reply and ignored the messages; however, after talking to a mutual friend, I found out he had actually read the messages and told everyone he didn't care because I 'wouldn't do it,'" she said.

She attempted to make contact with Mason one last time about the ring, but he ignored her. Finally, the woman sold the ring online and messaged Mason to let him know what she'd done.

In response, Mason drove over to her house and called her a "petty b**ch."

According to Nolo, a website that helps people handle simple legal matters, many states have laws that dictate who gets to keep an engagement ring once a relationship is called off.

"Courts typically treat an engagement ring as a 'conditional gift,' which means you must meet a future condition before you can consider the gift to be yours," the website explained.

"Although some parties have tried to convince the court that the condition of the engagement ring is to say 'yes' to the proposal, most state courts have rejected this argument stating that there's an implied condition of marriage that comes with a proposal and engagement ring," the website continued.

This would mean that the donor—the person who gave the ring—is entitled to keep the ring after the engagement is called off.

There are some exceptions, however.

"[S]ome states also take fault into consideration and look at who broke the engagement. In those states, the person that breaks off the engagement loses the ring," reported USA Today.

And in Montana, an engagement ring is considered an "unconditional gift," meaning the recipient gets to keep the ring, regardless of who called off the wedding, said the paper.

The woman did not disclose where she lives. However, commenters supported her decision to sell the ring, arguing that Mason was at fault for ignoring her attempts to give it back.

"NTA [not the a**hole]," said u/imjusthereforaita. "You gave him all the warning in the world."

"Plus, the wedding being canceled was HIS fault! He had choices and he made bad ones. All on him. Definitely NTA," replied u/stzulover.

"NTA he cheated AND refused to pay his half AND you warned him," commented u/Mads_w02.

Redditor u/541pnw916 added: "So...he f**ked around AND found out? NTA."

Engagement ring
The internet has rallied behind a woman who claimed in a now-viral post that she sold her engagement ring to cover the costs of her canceled wedding. "You gave him all the warning in the world," one commenter said. Kwangmoozaa/istock