Joji Fans Have Learned The Truth about Filthy Frank and It Isn't Pretty

Over the past two days "#JojiIsOverParty" has trended on Twitter, pulling in over 21,000 tweets. An account called "jinsolbi" tweeted out their shock that Miller had said the n-word in a song and found that song "offensive." The account is fairly small with under 30 followers and has since gone private. The hashtag seems to be mostly full of Joji fans aware of the singer's past controversies and shock, mocking those that might not be aware of Filthy Frank.

joji is over party twitter
The thumbnail for "Run" from Joji YouTube/88rising

George "Joji" Miller is a singer and songwriter known recently for his melodic tunes like "Gimme Love" and "Run." Miller didn't start out as the clean swooner that many identify him as today, beginning his public career on YouTube as Filthy Frank in 2011. Filthy Frank's entire character was built around being as grotesque and offensive as possible to parody these sort of behaviors. His videos had him doing outlandish stunts, like eating a cake made of his own hair or dressing up in a pink morph suit to scare denizens of New York City.

The Filthy Frank persona passed through to the mainstream in 2013 when he posted the original Harlem Shake video. From the "DizastaMusic" YouTube channel, Miller and his friends created the dance craze that captured the nation and talk show hosts' attention for the next few months.

Miller had always wanted to be a musician first. In 2015, he released the "Pink Guy" album and followed it up with "Pink Season" in 2017. The songs were vulgar but contained the spark of instrumental and melodic creations that Joji would grow to be popular for years later. After "Pink Season" was released and charted on Billboard, Miller decided that he would be retiring the character to focus on less meme-related content. He signed to record label 88rising, which in October of 2018 released his "Ballads 1" album.

"It was a humor that I started when I was in high school," Miller said in an interview with Billboard. "So naturally as I got older, I got tired of that humor. People's tastes change. People's humor changes."

Miller does not like to talk about his past as Filthy Frank, instead focusing on his current music career and singles. He has made no statement on his Twitter about the hashtag.