Man Not Helping Family Who Disowned Him 23 Years Ago Cheered: 'Satisfying'

The internet has cheered a man who refused to help his estranged family when they reached out to ask him for money.

Shared on Reddit's r/TrueOffMyChest forum on Wednesday, the user who posted under the account u/throw_away_28124049, explained what had happened.

"My estranged family asked me for money," he wrote. "I haven't seen or talked to any of them for 23 years. They disowned me for being gay when I was 17."

The percentage of U.S. adults who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender increased to 7.1 percent this year according to a survey by Gallup, doubling from 2012 when the demographic was first measured.

Happy couple and parents looking at bills
A stock image of a happy couple smiling together, and a picture of an older couple looking worried at bills. The internet has applauded a man for refusing to financially help his estranged family. Andrea Migliarini/whyframestudio/Getty Images

Research suggests that 27 percent of adults experience family estrangement initiated by either themselves or a family member—equating to around 65 million people in the U.S.

Receiving a call from one of their brothers and a sister, the Redditor was told that the family business was bankrupt and his parents are in danger of losing their house.

"They want me to pay it off," he wrote. "They figure I can because my husband is an opthalmologist."

But he denied to pay the money and said: "I've never laughed so hard. Telling them to f*** off was one of the most satisfying things I've ever done."

In more data collected by Gallup, there has been a clear shift in public feeling toward LGBTQ+ rights. Some 71 percent of people agree that married same-sex couples should be recognized by the law as valid with the same rights as traditional marriages—this is compared to just 27 percent recorded in 1996.

Similarly, in May 2022, 71 percent of respondents said gay and lesbian relations were morally acceptable, a rise of 31 percent since 2001 and representing a clear shift in opinion.

After reading the story about the man's family asking for financial help, hundreds of Reddit users headed to the comments to share their reactions and thoughts—overwhelmingly praising the man for his decision.

"Buy the house after they lose it and then kick them out," said one comment that received over 3,000 upvotes.

Another reply said: "If they couldn't accept you for how you are then they don't deserve to see any support when they declared you as separate from them, good on you."

"And that's how karma puts bad people in their place, they deserve it," said another Redditor: "I will never understand those people who reject someone just because of their sexual orientation."

Newsweek has reached out to u/throw_away_28124049 for comment. Newsweek has been unable to verify the details of this case.

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