Mo Brooks Appears to Accidentally Share Pin and Email Password on Twitter

Alabama GOP Congressman Mo Brooks appeared to accidentally reveal his Gmail password and his pin number while accusing California Democratic Representative Eric Swalwell's team of sneaking into his house to serve his wife with a lawsuit.

The staunch ally of former president Donald Trump took to Twitter on Sunday to complain about Swalwell, who has vowed for months to serve Brooks with a lawsuit in connection with his alleged role in the January 6 Capitol riots. However, Brooks, an Alabama GOP Rep. who is running for the Senate to represent the state, has been hard to track down, and Swalwell even hired a private investigator to find him.

On Sunday, Brooks tweeted: "@EricSwalwell Well, Swalwell FINALLY did his job, served complaint (on my WIFE). HORRIBLE Swalwell's team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife! Alabama Code 13A-7-2: 1st degree criminal trespass. Year in jail. $6000 fine. More to come!"

Criminal trespass is among one of the most common charges brought against the Capitol rioters by the Department of Justice.

Swalwell's attorney has denied that the lawmaker's team trespassed Brooks' property. Philip Adonian told Forbes on Sunday that Brooks' allegations are "utterly false." The individual who served the lawsuit "did not enter the house...and lawfully handed the paper to Mo Brooks' wife at their home", the lawyer said.

However, Brooks spokesperson Clay Milles told the website that the Republican lawmaker filed a police report over the alleged incident and claimed he had "video proof" the server entered his home without consent, and "refused to leave when Mrs. Brooks demanded."

In his Sunday tweet, Brooks included a picture of his desktop with the Alabama legislature website showing a "criminal trespass in the first degree" page with the definitions of the crime.

At the bottom of the picture, underneath the screen of the laptop, what appears to be Brooks' pin number, along with his Gmail account details and password, can be seen.

Newsweek has contacted Brooks and Swalwell for comment. This article will be updated if they respond.

Several people on social media derided Brooks for revealing sensitive security information to the public.

Too busy misinterpreting Alabama law to notice his gmail password in the screenshot... https://t.co/2Erk3KTdtY

— Steve Vladeck (@steve_vladeck) June 7, 2021

Steve Vladeck, the Charles Alan Wright Chair In Federal Courts at the University of Texas at Austin's school of law, said: "Too busy misinterpreting Alabama law to notice his gmail password in the screenshot...". His comments accompanied the photo Brooks posted with the sensitive details on.

Brian Tyler Cohen, a political commentator, added: "Mo Brooks, who sits on the Science, Space, and Technology Committee, just posted a photo with his gmail password taped to the bottom of his screen. I seem to remember email security being a pretty defining topic for the GOP."

Comedian and Twitter user Titus said: "The stunning and daily stupidly of the republicans [sic] is frightening. But thank you @MoBrooks for giving anonymous your password and pin. How do you walk and breathe?"

I wonder if Rep. Mo Brooks realizes his entire email history must have been exported to a bunch of computers before his staffers changed his password (they HAD to have changed it, right?) meaning every email helping to plan the insurrection (ALLEGEDLY) will be everywhere in days

— Melissa Hillman (@bittergertrude) June 7, 2021

Swalwell filed the lawsuit against Brooks back in March and for months has tried to track down the evasive Trump ally and Senate candidate, accusing him of helping to incite the January 6 Capitol riot in Washington, D.C, which left five people dead.

Swalwell's lawsuit alleges that Brooks, Trump and several GOP political allies including personal attorney Rudy Giuliani were "responsible for the injury and destruction" that took place on at the U.S. Capitol. The lawsuit primarily revolves around speeches given by Brooks and the other defendants at rallies just prior to the attacks.

"Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass," Brooks told a crowd outside the White House on the day of the riot. Brooks went on to discuss how his ancestors "sacrificed their blood" to create the freedoms Americans know today.

"The horrific events of January 6 were a direct and foreseeable consequence of the defendants' unlawful actions," the lawsuit alleges, citing civil rights laws. "As such, the defendants are responsible for the injury and destruction that followed."

Last week, the Democrat had to request a 60-day extension from a federal judge after failing to locate Brooks for several months.

Brooks, an ardent Trump supporter, is running for Alabama Senator Richard Shelby's seat.

Brooks has long backed the former president's unproven claims of "voter fraud" in the November general election, which he lost to Democratic rival Joe Biden.

Mo Brooks in Congress
Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) objects to the certification of votes from Nevada in the House Chamber during a reconvening of a joint session of Congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Brooks appeared to accidentally reveal his Gmail password and his pin number while accusing California Democratic Representative Eric Swalwell’s team of sneaking into his house to serve his wife with a lawsuit. Win McNamee/Getty