'My Boss Exploded': Employee Recounts Boss' Rant After 3rd Person Quit in Viral Post

A post on Reddit has gone viral after an employee claimed their boss "exploded" while speaking to the staff after a third person quit in a period of two weeks. The post has many Redditors talking, and it has been upvoted 115,000 times.

Redditor BUFFBOYZ4Lyfe shared the post to the subreddit r/antiwork on January 2. They titled the post, "My boss exploded."

"After the third person quit in a span of two weeks due to overwork and short-staffed issues, he slammed his office door and told us to gather round," the Redditor recounted.

The user said their boss went into "the most boomerific rant possible," paraphrasing what was said: "Well, Mike is out! Great! Just goes to show nobody wants to actually get off their a** and work these days! Life isn't easy, and people like him need to understand that! He wanted weekends off knowing d**n well we are understaffed. He claimed it was family issues or whatever. I don't believe the guy. Just hire a sitter! Thanks for everything y'all do. You guys are the only hope of this generation."

The employees apparently just "looked around" after that. Before concluding the post, the Redditor also revealed someone else quit just two hours later after their boss' rant. In response to another comment, the OP revealed they "do DoorDash and Uber Eats full-time now. Stress-free and I make more money."

According to Statista, in 2021 there were 152.72 million people employed in the United States. That is projected to increase to 159.82 million people working in 2022.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the number of people who quit their jobs increased in November 2021 to a record 4.5 million. This comes during a period of people leaving their jobs in record numbers known as the Great Resignation.

Businessman hands in resignation letter
A Reddit post has gone viral after an employee says their boss "exploded" after a third person quit. In the photo, a businessman hands over a resignation letter. CHARNCHAI/GETTY

Over 5,500 people have commented on the viral post, and many people don't agree with the boss' behavior.

"Wonder at what point boss man will come to realize that he is, in fact, the problem here?" a Redditor asked.

Another person didn't hold back. "This is the type of employer that should be ghosted," they wrote.

A Redditor had their own advice for the OP. "That's why it's important in these situations to let it be known that he is the issue while you also quit," they suggested. "The sooner these people learn that things need to change and we can't work on skeleton crews with no time off and for little pay the better."

One user thought the workers should have all "collectively asked for a raise on the spot."

One Redditor said, "I don't know how you stopped yourself laughing," to which the OP replied, "Oh we totally did when he left."

Some people recounted their own stories with their bosses. "I had a boss screaming at me once and I laughed in front of him," a Redditor revealed. "He yelled at me, 'This isn't funny,' and I managed to say, 'It wasn't a funny laugh.' He yelled a bit more then stormed out—slammed the door and squealed his tires pulling out of the parking lot."

A user had a question for the boss who has gone viral. "If it's so easy to just go hire someone [a babysitter], why can't you get a full staff so people aren't forced to work weekends?" they asked.

Someone else questioned whether the Redditor's boss is "paying people enough to hire a sitter."

While another thought the "mindset" of the boss "needs to die," adding, "So basically someone yells at the people who were actually at work, working, to stop working and listen to someone who tells the workers no one wants to work," they said.

Newsweek reached out to BUFFBOYZ4Lyfe for comment, who said: "My boss wanted us to be 'on-call' constantly during the weekends. This was a huge issue for people who applied for the Monday-Friday shifts. Due to being short-staffed, every new hire had to be prepared to work seven days a week. It created a cycle of hiring and quitting employees."

Updated 01/28/2022, 2:26 p.m. ET: This story has been updated with comments from BUFFBOYZ4Lyfe.