At Nevada GOP Caucuses, Chaos Reigns

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In Nevada, nothing ever goes the way it's supposed to, at least where the GOP is concerned. REUTERS/Jim Young

Donald Trump won the Nevada Republican caucuses on Tuesday, and in a way it's fitting that the bombastic real estate mogul scored his third victory amid allegations of voter fraud, mismanagement by the Nevada GOP and a general air of chaos.

Almost as soon as caucusgoers began to trickle into their appointed caucus locations Tuesday night, reports surfaced of things going wrong in Nevada: long lines, not enough ballots, voters voting twice, polling stations that were supposed to exist but didn't.

Man here says "it's a disaster." No one is checking in or checking IDs. They're handing out ballots willy nilly. Some guy voted trump twice

— Emily C. Singer (@CahnEmily) February 24, 2016

Not that this sort of thing is unusual for Nevada. In 2008, Ron Paul supporters hijacked the state nominating convention, forcing rule changes designed to help their candidate. Those measures delayed the process to the point that the party's event space rental for the state convention expired, and GOP bigwigs postponed it indefinitely. In 2012, Mitt Romney didn't find out he'd won Nevada until three days after the caucuses—local party leaders couldn't agree on a unified system for counting ballots. In Clark County, where two-thirds of the state lives, GOP representatives that year counted ballots by hand.

On Tuesday, reports also circulated that caucus volunteers showed up in Trump gear, including hats and shirts. In most states, even party-affiliated volunteers aren't supposed to show a preference for any candidate.

Says caucus volunteers are wearing Trump gear (they're not allowed to show preference). "Actively bullying folks. Not checking IDs."

— Elaina Plott (@elainaplott) February 24, 2016

The Nevada GOP said no official complaints were received about voting issues and tweeted on Tuesday that it didn't have a problem with volunteers showing up in Trump merchandise.

It's not against the rules for volunteers to wear candidate gear. Volunteers went through extensive training & are doing a great job

— Nevada GOP (@NVGOP) February 24, 2016