Ninety Will Be the New 40 in 10 Years' Time

The creators of a new program that aims to "reboot" your biological age say that within a decade people who live into their 90s could feel as if they are in their 40s, thanks to rapid advances in the longevity field.

The program and accompanying app, which launches Tuesday, were developed by Great Age Reboot, led by Dr. Michael Roizen, chief wellness officer emeritus at the Cleveland Clinic, and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Corey Bridges.

The aim of the program and app is to encourage users to develop healthy habits that will help reduce their physiological age, enabling them to feel younger than their calendar age.

"The goal of the program is to enable you to stay younger and stay on top of discoveries in the longevity field while not being misled," Roizen, who is a best-selling author, told Newsweek. "The aim is to help you avoid doing things that aren't healthy and to help you consistently do things that are healthy.

"Sometime in the next 10 years, we think you're going to be able to—because of the exponential advances in 14 areas of aging mechanism research—reboot yourself, so that if 60 is now the new 40, 90 will be the new 40," he said.

Among the 14 areas of research that Roizen is particularly excited about is a technique called therapeutic plasma exchange, which involves removing blood plasma and exchanging it with donated blood products.

In one notable study, this technique was shown to slow down several aspects of cognitive decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. In animal studies, it has been shown to reverse skin, pancreas, muscle and cardiovascular aging.

A couple enjoying the outdoors
Stock image: A couple enjoying the outdoors. Advances in the field of longevity promise to help people live longer, healthier lives. iStock

In developing the app, the Great Age Reboot team analyzed thousands of scientific papers to help create the content, which includes short videos and articles, brain games and other activities. Each user's experience is customized to that person, and the app even includes a feature where physicians can monitor the progress of their patients.

"What we're doing is building on Mike's life mission," Bridges told Newsweek. "It's not about extending your life so you have 30 more years in the nursing home. It's about giving you 30 more years in your prime so you can do whatever it is that you love, whatever it is that fuels you."

He continued: "The app is interactive in the sense that it learns about your progress, learns what your starting point is, listens to you about what you want to focus on in a prioritized way to turn back the clock. It seeks to inform and inspire you."

The app focuses on improving habits in several major areas of life that research has shown are key to longevity, such as stress management, diet, physical activity, sleep and brain health.

When it comes to stress management, the most important thing, according to Roizen, is having "posse and purpose"—i.e., cultivating friends and having a purpose.

In terms of nutrition, Roizen said, "food is a relationship, so you should only eat food you love but that also loves you back."

The Reboot Your Age app
Screenshots taken from the Reboot Your Age app, which encourages users to develop healthy habits that will help reduce their physiological age. Great Age Reboot

He continued: "And with that, eating in the right time, the right amount and doing five days every quarter of decreased food intake. So five days of 750-calorie-intake resets your aging markers to a younger self—every one of them that we know of."

Another major component of the app's focus is physical activity, which has been shown to make a difference in how long and well you live. Key activities include cardiovascular workouts, resistance training and jumping, as well as walking, according to Roizen.

"There is validation in the 10,000 steps a day [goal]," he said. "It's the inflection point on chronic disease development. Although it was developed by a Japanese pedometer maker, it actually has valid data."

When it comes to brain wellness, Roizen said, there are more than 30 things you can do to slow your rate of brain aging, such as playing speed of processing games or consuming a tablespoon and a half of olive oil every day.

"And with that goes the component of sleep—getting rid of brain waste as you sleep longer and better," Roizen said.

The longevity expert also pointed to several supplements that have been shown in randomized, controlled trials to have a benefit on physiological aging. One example of this is phosphocreatine.

"Phosphocreatine is used by young people to build muscle," Roizen said. "It's very rarely used by the elderly. But it's been shown in randomized, controlled trials to not only build muscle in the elderly and help prevent the decrease in muscle mass as you get older but also to improve brain functioning."

Subscriptions for the Reboot Your Age app cost $34.95 per month or $299.95 annually. You can try before you buy with a free 10-day trial.