North Carolina Republican Accuses Georgia-Born Warnock of 'Disguising Himself' as Southern

North Carolina GOP congressman-elect Madison Cawthorn baselessly accused Georgia-born senate candidate Reverend Raphael Warnock of "disguising himself" as a southern pastor to win votes.

Cawthorn, who responded to his November election win by saying, "cry more, lib," lashed out at Democratic senate runoff candidate Warnock Tuesday by calling the longtime pastor's native Georgia roots into question. Cawthorn echoed the complaints of President Donald Trump and Warnock's opponent, GOP senator Kelly Loeffler, by claiming Warnock is a "radical's radical." Cawthorn questioned how Warnock can "say he's a pastor" while being "all about abortion."

Warnock, 51, was born in Savannah, Georgia, in July 1969, about 26 years before Cawthorn was born.

Speaking on Fox News Tuesday morning from Alpharetta, Georgia, Cawthorn explained the "reason I'm coming down here" from North Carolina is to prevent Democratic senate candidates Warnock and Jon Ossoff from giving their party a majority vote in the upper chamber. If the two Democrats win the upcoming January 5 Senate runoff election, he said their party will essentially take control of Washington itself.

"you see this warnock fella who's coming down here and disguising himself as some moderate pastor from the south"

warnock was born and raised in savannah, georgia and has been a pastor since the 1990s pic.twitter.com/86wwjhJq0p

— Bobby Lewis (@revrrlewis) December 15, 2020

Cawthorn, 25, claimed only incumbent Republicans Loeffler and David Perdue "represent the values" held by southern conservatives and "most" Americans nationwide.

"You see this Warnock fella who is coming down here and disguising himself as some moderate pastor from the South who doesn't believe in these radical ideas," Cawthorn told Fox. "But if you look at him really, what he actually believes, he's a radical's radical, he wants to defund our police, he says he's a pastor, but he's all about abortion. This is somebody who does not represent what real Americans believe."

Cawthorn's office did not respond to Newsweek's request for him to define what "real Americans" or being "all about abortion" means.

According to fellow church leaders and members of the congregation, Warnock has been a senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta since 2005. That is the same lectern that was occupied by civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. decades earlier. In 2013, Warnock authored a book on Black Christian theology.

The North Carolina GOP congressman-elect continued on Fox & Friends, saying Warnock doesn't represent southern values.

"If we cede control of our senate, and really all of Washington D.C. to the Democrats, it's not going to represent the values of my home in western North Carolina, and certainly not the values of Georgia and not the values of most of the people in the United State of America," he added.

Warnock received criticism from fellow Black southern pastors this week in addition to the white, out-of-state congressman-elect. A group of 25 right-leaning Black pastors from Georgia penned a letter to Bishop Garland Hunt Monday, saying Warnock's abortion stance contradicts their Christian teachings.

"As a Christian pastor and as a Black leader, you have a duty to denounce the evil of abortion, which kills a disproportionate number of Black children. Your open advocacy of abortion is a scandal to the faith and to the Black community."

Newsweek reached out to Warnock's campaign Tuesday morning for additional remarks but did not receive a reply before publication.

Touting himself as an 8th-generation resident of North Carolina, Cawthorn was mocked earlier this year after he botched several U.S. history remarks during the GOP convention. Among his many historical errors, Cawthorn inaccurately claimed James Madison—who he described as his favorite historical figure—signed the Declaration of Independence.

madison cawthorn nc republican warnock
North Carolina GOP congressman-elect Madison Cawthorn baselessly accused Georgia-born senate candidate Reverend Raphael Warnock of "disguising himself" as a southern pastor to win votes. Screenshot: Fox News | Twitter