North Korean Defector Seen Running From Soldiers and Bullets in Dramatic Escape Video

The North Korean soldier dashed across his nation's border to reach South Korea as guards chased him, firing a hail of bullets and crossing into enemy territory before eventually giving up.

It's not a scene from a movie, but the true story of a North Korean soldier's defection from Kim Jong Un's brutal regime. United Nations Command released video of the daring escape Wednesday, noting that North Korea had violated a decades-old peace treaty when its soldiers armed with pistols and AK-47 rifles chased after the defector into South Korea. The North Korean border guards nearly caught the soldier, whose rank and identity remain unknown.

The video shows a military vehicle driving down a tree-lined road, at one point getting stuck in a ditch. The defector then jumps out of the car. Shortly after a handful of North Korea soldiers are shown chasing after the defector. One appears to cross the border briefly before returning to North Korea.

The soldier suffered at least five gunshot wounds during his November 13 escape. He was taken by a U.S. military helicopter to a hospital near Seoul.

"He is fine," lead surgeon Lee Cook-Jong said at a press conference in Suwon, Reuters reported. "He is not going to die."

The defector can then be seen lying on the ground after he was shot in the video. He was later dragged to safety by three South Korean troops.

A United Nations Command spokesman said North Korea was told the North Korean People's Army (KPA) had violated a 1953 armistice agreement by crossing the Military Demarcation Line (MDL), or border. The peace deal marked the unofficial end of the Korean War. Both the South and North are technically still engaged in war under the agreement.

The shooting marked the first gunfire attack at the border in more than three decades despite tensions between the two Koreas.

"The key findings of the special investigation team are that the KPA violated the armistice agreement by one, firing weapons across the MDL, and two, by actually crossing the MDL temporarily," Chad Carroll, director of public affairs for the UNC, told reporters.

More than 30,000 North Koreans have defected to South Korea since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War.

North Korean Defector Seen Running From Soldiers and Bullets in Dramatic Escape Video | U.S.