Nursing Home Resident's Leg Amputated Due to Conditions at Warehouse Used for Ida Evacuees

A resident of a Louisiana nursing home has lost his leg to amputation after he was evacuated to a warehouse facility ahead of hurricane Ida that the state has shut down for unsafe conditions.

Andrew Hicks, 59, was living at Park Place Healthcare Nursing Home in Gretna, Louisiana when he, along with residents from six other nursing homes, were transferred to a warehouse in Tangipahoa Parish amid concerns of damage from hurricane Ida.

Hicks' wife Terry, 58, was not informed that her husband was being moved, and only found him when a family member sent her a picture of her husband in a wheelchair with his foot bandaged and his head in his hands in an article on NOLA.com about nursing home patients being evacuated from unsafe conditions.

"We see him in the picture. He is so, so distressed. And we just, I just couldn't do nothing," Hicks told local news station WDSU. "He is very traumatized. He is very traumatized. I hate to see him like this...And due to the neglect to get his leg amputated...that really hurts."

Hurricane Ida
A resident of a Louisiana nursing home has lost his leg to amputation after he was evacuated to a warehouse facility ahead of hurricane Ida that the state has shut down for unsafe conditions. Seen above is damage from Hurricane Ida in Grand Isle, Louisiana, on September 4, 2021. Sean Rayford/Getty

Hicks said when she finally tracked her husband down he was waiting for surgery on his leg at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center. Doctors told her his leg needed to be amputated because he had developed gangrene—likely because of his foot sitting in standing water.

Conditions in the warehouse are also believed to have lead to the death of six nursing home residents. The warehouse has been shut down by state officials, and all of the nursing homes involved have lost their licenses.

Louisiana State Senator Kirk Talbot called the conditions at the Tangipahoa warehouse, which reportedly included mattresses on the floor, standing water, overflowing toilets, broken air conditioning and patients soaking in their own excrement, "outrageous,' adding, "our senior citizens deserve better than this."

Talbot said he would like to take on the nursing home industry and introduce a law requiring nursing homes have enough backup power to keep their vulnerable residents safe following storms.

All seven of the nursing homes that sent residents to the warehouse are owned by Baton Rouge real estate investor Bob Dean. Newsweek reached out to his office but did not immediately hear back.