Oregon's Bootleg Fire, Reaching 212,000 Acres, May Not be Put Out Until the Fall

Oregon's Bootleg Fire, which has now grown to over 212,000 acres, may not be fully contained until the fall, according to fire officials.

According to data posted on the InciWeb, the National Fire Information Center's website, the Bootleg Fire has burned 212,377 acres and is currently 5 percent contained. In a previous update, fire officials said that the estimated containment date for the Bootleg Fire was Nov. 30.

A public information officer for Northwest Incident Management Team 10, which is fighting the fire, said to Newsweek in a written statement that the estimated containment date was set for November because officials "will have a great deal of mop-up, repair and recovery to complete."

The cause of the fire remains under investigation, according to fire officials.

"Dry and windy conditions contributed to another day of active fire behavior on the Bootleg Fire burning in Southern Oregon. Firefighters reported growth primarily to the east in the greater Gearhart Wilderness area," fire officials said in an update on Wednesday. "Air operations were severely limited due to unsafe flying conditions in heavy smoke."

Rob Allen, incident commander for the PNW2 Incident Management Team, said in the update that fire crews are, "making steady progress where winds and terrain allow."

"But for the third day in a row, firefighters had to disengage at times for their safety and weather isn't going to change for the foreseeable future," Allen continued.

Over the past several days, dry and hot weather has allowed the Bootleg Fire to increase in size. The fire burned around 50,000 acres last week but grew to around 153,000 acres by Monday. On Tuesday, fire officials reported on InciWeb that the Bootleg Fire burned 201,923 acres, indicating that it grew by over a third in size overnight.

Numerous photos of the Bootleg Fire have been posted across social media, showing its size, as well as the fire's smoke path.

"Expected #wildfire smoke near the surface today (Tuesday) in SW Oregon and northern California. Thickest smoke to impact areas near Klamath Falls. Travelers on Highways 140 and 97 be aware of reduced visibility," the National Weather Service in Medford, Oregon said in a tweet.

Expected #wildfire smoke near the surface today (Tuesday) in SW Oregon and northern California. Thickest smoke to impact areas near Klamath Falls. Travelers on Highways 140 and 97 be aware of reduced visibility. #BootlegFire #JackFire #ORwx #CAwx pic.twitter.com/ZjwPzXM01z

— NWS Medford (@NWSMedford) July 13, 2021

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Satellite Twitter account posted a video of the smoke seen from space.

"Here is another version of Oregon's #BootlegFire from last evening, seen here in a zoomed-in GeoColor/#Fire," the tweet said. "This fast-moving #wildfire is currently the nation's largest active fire."

UPDATE: Here is another version of Oregon's #BootlegFire from last evening, seen here in a zoomed-in GeoColor/#Fire Temperature composite from @NOAA's #GOES17🛰️. This fast-moving #wildfire is currently the nation's largest active fire. pic.twitter.com/x0ouvo5FTM

— NOAA Satellites - Public Affairs (@NOAASatellitePA) July 13, 2021

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown had previously invoked the state's Emergency Conflagration Act in response to the Bootleg Fire.

"Southern Oregon is still recovering from last year's devastating wildfires, and I will do everything in my power to ensure resources are available to contain the Bootleg Fire, as well as others that are burning across the state. This is a reminder that Oregonians must continue to be firewise, fire-safe, and to honor all burn bans," Brown said in a statement.

Oregon Wildfire
The Bootleg Fire in Oregon has grown to over 212,000 acres and may not be put out until the fall. A sign warning of impending fire danger is posted on September 10, 2020 in Estacada, Oregon Nathan Howard/Getty