Photos of Hurricane Ida's Devastation and Flooding in Louisiana

Hurricane Ida struck Louisiana as a Category 4 hurricane Sunday, and even after it weakened to a tropical storm, the state is still feeling the force of its powerful winds and heavy rains.

Below are photos and videos that show Ida's devastating force and the immense damage left in its wake.

Lousiana fire chief
Montegut Fire Chief Toby Henry walks back to his fire truck in the rain as firefighters cut through trees on the road in Bourg, Louisiana, as Hurricane Ida passes through on Sunday. Getty

More than a million people are currently without power in Louisiana. Outages were reported early, many caused by downed power lines. This fallen electrical transmission tower in Jefferson Parish resulted in a major disruption for the area.

Before and after a major electrical transmission tower in Jefferson Parish collapsed: https://t.co/6DM2hGlizs pic.twitter.com/dsxYfS7Zmg

— FOX 8 New Orleans (@FOX8NOLA) August 30, 2021

The parish, located about 30 miles south of New Orleans, was one of Ida's first mainland targets. Much of the damage there came at night, forcing most search and rescue operations to be delayed until daylight. The parish itself is naturally a difficult place for such efforts.

"This is an area that has a lot of swampland, alligators—very dangerous conditions. They had to wait for the sun to come up this morning. They had a strategy," Jefferson Parish President Cynthia Lee told CNN. "We have people out there ready to clear roads. We're going to have boats, high-water vehicles. Our first responders are ready to go. They just needed the daylight to be able to do their best work."

Roadways throughout Louisiana were quickly covered in water.

Picture in Laplace, LA taken this morning of highway 51 and on-ramp to I-10 completely covered in water...#HurricaneIda pic.twitter.com/CPXp0qUtGj

— Pluto 💕. (@1K__Jay) August 30, 2021

The National Hurricane Center posted an advisory Monday morning that said Tropical Storm Ida was moving northward over southwestern Mississippi. But it noted that dangerous storm surges and flash flooding could continue over portions of southeastern Louisiana, southern Mississippi and southern Alabama.

This airplane video from the hurricane center shows footage from inside the eye of the storm.

Video from the National Hurricane Center in the US shows the inside of the eye of Hurricane Ida. The team of researchers are on a P3 aircraft, which was originally developed for the US Navy for surveillance missions.

Read the latest here: https://t.co/fAhGX5VGbz pic.twitter.com/yBsbi8q6jd

— Sky News (@SkyNews) August 30, 2021

At one point, Hurricane Ida was so powerful it actually reversed the flow of the Mississippi River for a period on Sunday afternoon.

The Mississippi River during Hurricane Ida. David Grunfeld video pic.twitter.com/PXIXrC5DOt

— David Grunfeld (@DavidGrunfeld) August 29, 2021

Dramatic images filled local news station reports and social media, including this picture of a man by Lake Pontchartrain on Sunday.

A man takes pictures of high waves along the shore of Lake Pontchartrain as Hurricane Ida nears, Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021, in New Orleans.

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) pic.twitter.com/CVN0rdcOs8

— wdsu (@wdsu) August 29, 2021

Twitter users quickly shared videos of the destruction to local businesses.


News outlets also captured the destruction.

WATCH: Video from Lafourche Parish shows a powerful #HurricaneIda ripping through the area. pic.twitter.com/nVR4feC4Q9

— WWL-TV (@WWLTV) August 30, 2021

As the sun rose on New Orleans Monday morning, the devastation from the storm started to become apparent in the city. Hurricane Ida is already being called one of the most powerful storms to ever hit the U.S. mainland, and early images offer only a sample of the destruction it caused.


The photo below from New Orleans' French Quarter shows part of a building's roof on the street after it was blown off on Sunday.

New Orleans Ida
Hurricane Ida tears through New Orleans' French Quarter on Sunday. Getty Images

Roofs were a common target for Ida's winds, as seen in this video of Lady of the Sea General Hospital in Cut Off, Louisiana.


Residents in the Gulf of Mexico regions were urged to continue sheltering in place on Monday morning.


More than 50 million people are under flash flood watches.

Truck IDA
A truck drives through heavy winds and rain from Hurricane Ida in Bourg, Louisiana, on Sunday. Getty Images

Winds were a major source of havoc from Ida.


Videos of the storm surge in New Orleans show a sample of Ida's power.

Hurricane Ida Caused A Fairly Substantial Storm Surge In New Orleans pic.twitter.com/aTWqbzLHTH

— Public News DC (@PublicNewsDC) August 30, 2021

One of the earliest known historic sites decimated by Ida was New Orleans' Karnofsky Shop. Louis Armstrong worked at the jazz record shop, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Karnofsky shop in New Orleans suffers severe damage from Hurricane Ida. https://t.co/aHz1Ud2vvF

📷 Devika Krishna Kuma / Reuters pic.twitter.com/IyxKAbf03J

— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 30, 2021

The Louisiana National Guard tweeted Monday about its response to the search and rescue operations being conducted throughout the state.

In the last 72 hours we have activated 4,900 Guardsmen, staged 195 high-water vehicles, 73 rescue boats, 34 helicopters ready to assist in the recovery from Hurricane #Ida. #ProtectWhatMatters pic.twitter.com/VxQRUyK1u2

— LA National Guard (@LANationalGuard) August 30, 2021

New York City also sent help to parts of Louisiana.

Safe travels. With rescue equipment packed @fema US&R NY-TF1 is on the way to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Over 80 specially trained personnel from the NYPD, FDNY and NYC OEM along with 6 NYPD ESU search & rescue #K9 will be assisting in the rescue efforts during #Hurricane Ida. pic.twitter.com/NnY2iGKuGr

— NYPD Special Ops (@NYPDSpecialops) August 29, 2021

The destruction from Ida is expected to continue, and the National Weather Service cautioned about the threat of tornadoes as a result of Ida.

Some tornado threat continues across the central Gulf States due to Ida. Bands of convection with embedded supercells will persist through the day and spread slowly eastward into Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle through mid afternoon. pic.twitter.com/eBBD4b727U

— National Weather Service (@NWS) August 30, 2021