Pit Bull Fatally Mauls Owner in His Home: Police

A man in Illinois has died after he tried to stop his own pit bull and another from fighting at his home, according to police.

Juan Ruiz, 66, from Kewanee, died after he was attacked at his home in the 800 block of North Vine Street at about 6 p.m. on April 24, according to Kewanee chief of police Nicholas Welgat.

Kewanee Police Department (KPD) officers said they were dispatched to the home at about 12:34 a.m. on April 25 and found a man unresponsive and bleeding from multiple wounds.

The man, later identified as Ruiz, was later pronounced dead by paramedics on the scene.

Stock image of pitt bull
Stock image of pit bull. Ruiz died as a result of his injuries. Getty

According to DogsBite.org, a group that aims to reduce the number of serious dog attacks, 35 breeds were involved in 433 human deaths as a result of a fatal bite in a 13-year period in the U.S. The 2018 report found that pit bulls were involved in nearly 66 percent of attacks.

Welgat added in a Friday, April 29 Facebook post: "The victim contacted family members and advised them of the situation by telephone. Family members instructed him to call for an ambulance or to go to the hospital for treatment if the wounds were severe, as they were out of town.

"The victim stated to family that he had bandaged the wounds and he was okay. When family members returned to the home after midnight, they found the victim unresponsive and called 911."

Officers impounded both dogs at the Kewanee Animal Control Facility and said that the pet that caused the fatal wound was later surrendered to city officials.

Welgat added in the Facebook post: "The dog was then euthanized as it was deemed too vicious and a danger to the community. The second dog is being treated for multiple injuries caused by the aggressive dog.

"This dog will also be evaluated for a period of time by the Animal Control Facility staff to ensure that it does not pose a threat to the public before it is released to the owners."

Newsweek has contacted the KPD for comment.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are several things you can do if you are approached by an unfamiliar dog, which include:

  • Stay still and be calm.
  • Avoid direct eye contact with the dog.
  • Do not panic, make loud noises, or run.
  • Say "no" or "go home" in a firm, deep voice and stand with the side of your body facing the dog.
  • Slowly raise your hands to your neck with your elbows in and wait for the dog to pass or slowly back away.