Record-Breaking Temperatures to Hit West Again Just 3 Weeks After Death Valley's Hottest Day Ever

Several areas across the West Coast are expected to be hit with record-breaking high temperatures during Labor Day weekend, just 21 days after Death Valley recorded its hottest day ever.

Over the past few days, the National Weather Service in Los Angeles issued warnings to residents of extremely high temperatures during the upcoming weekend.

"The heat is about to begin! High tempts over 100 are expected across the valleys today with mid 80s and 90s over the inland coast," NWS Los Angeles wrote on Twitter Friday. "It's only going to get hotter through the weekend so be prepared."

The heat is about to begin! High temps over 100 are expected across the valleys today with mid 80s to 90s over the inland coast. It's only going to get hotter through the weekend so be prepared! #CAwx #LAheat #heatwave pic.twitter.com/48arJr1gSz

— NWS Los Angeles (@NWSLosAngeles) September 4, 2020

NWS Los Angles also reported the Palmdale Airport tying its record high of 106 degrees on Thursday, noting that it "is just the beginning of more potential record breaking heat."

Palmdale Airport tied their record high of 106 degrees yesterday (here's the report: https://t.co/0HzWPHLZBx) and this is just the beginning of more potential record breaking heat. We're not expecting any records today but on Sat and Sun many records could fall. #CAwx #LAheat

— NWS Los Angeles (@NWSLosAngeles) September 4, 2020

"We're not expecting any records today but on Sat and Sun many records could fall," it added.

In addition to Los Angeles expecting high temperatures, the National Weather Service in California's Bay Area also issued an "excessive heat warning" on Thursday, which will be in effect from Saturday at 11 a.m. local time to Monday at 9 p.m.

UPGRADE: the Heat Watch has been upgraded to an Excessive Heat Warning: w/ adding the N. Salinas Valley. Little heat relief will be near the coast. A Heat Advisory has been issued for coastal areas

Valid from Saturday at 11 AM to Monday at 9PM PDT#CAwx #LaborDayWeekend pic.twitter.com/BGhGbmIlX8

— NWS Bay Area (@NWSBayArea) September 3, 2020

The warning encourages residents to limit outdoor strenuous activities, stay in air-conditioned areas when possible, and to drink plenty of fluids.

Warnings for extreme high temperatures were also issued by the National Weather Service in Las Vegas and Phoenix.

"The Labor Day Weekend Outlook includes RECORD #heat, so make sure your plants are heat-proof," NWS Las Vegas also wrote on Twitter, with a picture that shows temperatures in the area ranging from 109 degrees Fahrenheit to 116.

The Labor Day Weekend Outlook includes RECORD #heat, so make sure your plans are heat-proof! Other than the heat, winds should remain light over the weekend with plenty of blue skies. #NVwx #AZwx #VegasWeather #heatwave pic.twitter.com/WAj6aKmaAh

— NWS Las Vegas (@NWSVegas) September 4, 2020

According to NWS Phoenix, based on forecasted high temperatures, Phoenix is expected to have the hottest Labor Day weekend on record, with a forecasted temperature of 110.7 degrees Fahrenheit. Yuma, Arizona is also expected to reach record-high temperatures.

This is shaping up to be the hottest Labor Day Weekend on record, so please make sure to take proper precautions from the deadly heat. #azwx pic.twitter.com/s8tQfQY4XQ

— NWS Phoenix (@NWSPhoenix) September 3, 2020

"An Excessive Heat Warning will begin tomorrow and last through the #LaborDayWeekend," NWS Phoenix tweeted along with a map that showed which areas are included in the warning. "Afternoon temps will swell above 110 degrees for numerous locations," the tweet read.

An Excessive Heat Warning will begin tomorrow and last through the #LaborDayWeekend. Afternoon temps will swell above 110° for numerous locations. You are urged to take any necessary precautions to mitigate your heat risk. #azwx #cawx pic.twitter.com/n00DK4FFEn

— NWS Phoenix (@NWSPhoenix) September 3, 2020

The record-high temperatures expected in the different areas across the West Coast come only three weeks after California's Death Valley reported a record-breaking temperature of 130 degrees Fahrenheit on August 16. Prior to this, Earth's hottest-known day was recorded in Death Valley on July 10, 1913 at 134 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

The high temperatures are also coming at a time where California continues to fight off numerous wildfires across the state. According to a map from The Los Angeles Times, there are currently 43 wildfires across California, with the largest being the SCU Lightening Complex fire, which was burned over 390,000 acres and is currently 80 percent contained.

Death Valley
DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA - AUGUST 18: The Devil's Golf Course salt pan is viewed on August 18, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. The temperature reached 130 degrees at Death Valley National Park on August 16, hitting what may be the hottest temperature recorded on Earth since at least 1913, according to the National Weather Service. Park visitors have been warned, ‘Travel prepared to survive.’ Getty/Mario Tama/Getty Images