Revealed in the bin Laden Documents: The Declassified Al-Qaeda Job Application

Al Qaeda
The Al-Qaeda job application, declassified Wednesday. ODNI

On Wednesday, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released dozens of files recovered during the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound. Within the files, referred to by the ODNI as "Bin Ladin's Bookshelf" (an alternative spelling for the Al-Qaeda leader's last name) is a terrorist application.

The file, entitled "Instructions to Applicants," is watermarked with the official Al-Qaeda seal: "The Security Committee, al-Qaeda Organization, O ye people of faith, be vigilant." It asks applicants to fill out the questionnaire "clearly and legibly."

Below the intro, it reads like many a formal application: name, date, address, native tongue, marital state, age and education. From there, it asks, "How long do you plan to stay in the jihadi theater?" and "How much of the holy Qur'an have you memorized?"

The application also asks whether the potential jihadi has any hobbies or has invented anything. "What is your favorite material: science or literature?" Al-Qaeda asks. "Do you know any workers or experts in chemistry, communications or any other field?" The application points toward wanting to recruit both chemists and spokespeople.

Much of the application focuses on travel: where the candidate has been, where the person holds passports from, if the person has crossed into Pakistan and how difficult the person's travel experiences have been.

Strangely, the application also asks for criminal history, medical history and work experience.

Of course, jihadi goals are also inquired about: "Do you wish to execute a suicide operation?" and "What objectives would you like to accomplish on your jihad path?"

The application concludes by asking, "Who should we contact in case you became a martyr?"

Read the full application below:

Declassified Application for Al-Qaeda Terrorists Found With bin Laden

Revealed in the bin Laden Documents: The Declassified Al-Qaeda Job Application | Culture