Former Republican congressman Ron Paul says he's been blocked by Facebook from managing his account over repeated violations of the social media giant's "community standards."

"With no explanation other than 'repeatedly going against our community standards,' @Facebook has blocked me from managing my page. Never have we received notice of violating community standards in the past and nowhere is the offending post identified," Paul wrote on Twitter Monday.

The post included a screenshot of his Facebook page, which had the message informing him of his limited functionality. Paul wrote in a second Twitter post that the only thing he put on Facebook Monday was "my weekly 'Texas Straight Talk' column, which I have published every week since 1976."

Newsweek reached out to Facebook for comment on why Paul was blocked and which of his posts violated its community standards, but did not receive a response before publication.

Senator Rand Paul, a Kentucky Republican and Paul's son, responded to Facebook's action by writing on Twitter, "Facebook now considers advocating for liberty to be sedition. Where will it end?"

The column Paul posted Monday to his Facebook page was about tech censorship. In the days following the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, Twitter, Facebook and other sites took action against Trump. Commenting on blocking the president from publishing content, the social media giants cited rules prohibiting content that incites violence.

"Last week's massive social media purges—starting with President Trump's permanent ban from Twitter and other outlets—was shocking and chilling, particularly to those of us who value free expression and the free exchange of ideas," Paul wrote in the column.

Former Texas Representative Ron Paul attends Consensus 2019 at the Hilton Midtown on May 13, 2019, in New York City. Paul tweeted Monday that he was blocked from managing his Facebook page for repeatedly violating its community standards.Steven Ferdman/Getty

This past Friday, Twitter issued the most sweeping punishment of any social media company when it permanently suspended Trump's account, which had more than 88 million followers. The company said two tweets Trump posted on January 8 violated its rules against glorifying violence.

In one post, he called his supporters "patriots" who "will not be disrespected or treated unfairly in any way." In the second tweet, Trump announced he would not be attending the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

Facebook and Instagram have also banned Trump from posting on their sites for at least the remainder of his term, which will end on January 20, though the ban could last indefinitely.

Paul's Facebook page is still active and can be viewed by users. The former representative served Texas for decades and ran for president twice before retiring in 2013. He also founded the Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity, a foreign policy think tank that seeks to expand his "lifetime of public advocacy for a peaceful foreign policy and the protection of civil liberties at home."

Newsweek reached out to the Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity for further comment on the action from Facebook but did not receive a response prior to publication.