School Asks Boys to Grade Girls With Points for Attractiveness, Being a 'Strong Christian'

Boys at an Anglican school in Australia were asked to assign points to rate certain qualities of a girl, including popularity, attractiveness and if they were a virgin.

The assignment was part of the grade 10 boy's Christian studies lesson last week at St. Luke's Grammar School. The co-ed school near Sydney separated the girls into another room to read articles about the importance of maintaining their virginity until marriage, The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

"You have 25 points to allocate on qualities that you would look for in a girl. Now, this is supposed to be for a lasting relationship. Listed below are a number of qualities, each marked with a point system. You have to prioritize what you think is important," the boys' exercise read.

The exercise was broken down into six different point categories. One-point qualities included having money, holding similar beliefs, caring about the world and being generous. Two points were awarded to girls who were "the right height," brave, excelling in school and standing up for their rights.

Well-dressed and groomed, good-mannered, good kissers who owned a car were granted three points in the exercise. Girls who went to church, are friendly and do not cheat got four points.

At the top of the ranking scale, physically fit, funny and wise girls earned five points. Popularity, being a strong Christian, trustworthiness and being a virgin were among the six-point qualities.

The boys had to spend their points to "build a bitch," as some of the boys described it, according to The Herald.

Boy in School Classroom
High school students take the philosophy exam, the first test session of the 2015 baccalaureate on June 17, 2015 in Paris. Boys at an Australian school were asked to rank attractive qualities of girls in a Christian studies class. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

"All the girls were disgusted and really offended," a student told The Herald.

"[The boys] think joking about it was okay because their own teacher was telling them it was okay," another student said after the boys in the class laughed about the assignment.

The school's headmaster, Geoff Lancaster, sent out a letter to parents apologizing for the lesson. Lancaster spoke to the Christian studies teacher who assigned the exercise.

"He is very sorry for the offense he has caused and saddened to think that the way this discussion was framed has upset our students," Lancaster said in the letter on behalf of the teacher.

Lancaster's letter went on to say that the school has been teaching students complex issues like toxic masculinity and consent through the lens of Christianity in order to build healthy and equal relationships.

"St. Luke's always has been, and always will be, a school that respects, values and honors all students," Lancaster wrote.

Lancaster told parents he would be personally reviewing the Christian studies curriculum, and the class will be co-ed for the second semester.

Lancaster also directly addressed the students Monday to make it clear to them that the exercise was inappropriate and against the values of the school, according to The Herald.

"Despite the best efforts to teach respect, healthy relationships, gender equality, consent and inclusivity, we don't always get it right - and last week is a good example of how the very best intentions can go terribly wrong," Lancaster told The Herald.

Newsweek reached out to St. Luke's Grammar School but did not hear back by publication time.