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CHANGING CHANNELS

The death of television has been predicted almost since its birth. Back in 1946, Hollywood producer Darryl F. Zanuck famously announced that TV wouldn't last more than six months because "people will get tired of staring at a plywood box every night." A decade later, when the remote control was invented, industry types worried that this miracle device would destroy their businesses by turning viewers into ad-avoiding serial clickers.

Internet TV: Telly Heaven

Akiko Takasu loves TV dramas. Every morning the violin teacher and mother of three teenagers in Saitama, north of Tokyo, quickly finishes her morning chores--cleaning up the house, doing laundry and dishes.

THE AIRWAVES GO DIGITAL

Whether you use it to catch the news, distract the kids or channel-surf from the depths of a couch, that television in the corner hasn't changed much since the leap from black-and-white to color.

ONE BILLION COUCH POTATOES

Chairman Mao's portrait still decorates many households in Yaoli, a former communist guerilla base in China's Jiangxi province. But what mesmerizes the people these days is television.

TELEVISION RELOADED

Forty-four years ago, when Newton Minow famously described television as a vast wasteland, he might have hit the bull's-eye on the wasteland part. But he didn't know from vast.

Changing Channels

The death of television has been predicted almost since its birth . Back in 1946, Hollywood producer Darryl F. Zanuck famously announced that TV wouldn't last more than six months because "people will get tired of staring at a plywood box every night." A decade later, when the remote control was invented, industry types worried that this miracle device would destroy their businesses by turning viewers into ad-avoiding serial clickers.

INTERNET TV: TELLY HEAVEN

Akiko Takasu loves TV dramas. Every morning the violin teacher and mother of three teenagers in Saitama, north of Tokyo, quickly finishes her morning chores--cleaning up the house, doing laundry and dishes.

The Airwaves Go Digital

Whether you use it to catch the news, distract the kids or channel-surf from the depths of a couch, that television in the corner hasn't changed much since the leap from black-and-white to color.

One Billion Couch Potatoes

Chairman Mao's portrait still decorates many households in Yaoli, a former communist guerilla base in China's Jiangxi province. But what mesmerizes the people these days is television.

Television Reloaded

Forty-four years ago, when Newton Minow famously described television as a vast wasteland, he might have hit the bull's-eye on the wasteland part. But he didn't know from vast.

TELEVISION RELOADED

Forty-four years ago, when Newton Minow famously described television as a vast wasteland, he might have hit the bull's-eye on the wasteland part. But he didn't know from vast.

A CLICK AWAY: INTERNET TV

Mark Gray thinks that the future of television lies in giving couch potatoes less, not more. "You can plug in your cable box and get 500 channels, most of which you're not interested in," he says.

One Click Away: TV Via the Web

Mark Gray thinks that the future of television lies in giving couch potatoes less, not more. "You can plug in your cable box and get 500 channels, most of which you're not interested in," he says.

ONE CLICK AWAY: TV VIA THE WEB

Mark Gray thinks that the future of television lies in giving couch potatoes less, not more. "You can plug in your cable box and get 500 channels, most of which you're not interested in," he says.

GETTING THE WHOLE WORLD IN YOUR HAND

What struck me about last week's Consumer Electronics Show--the huge annual gadget bacchanalia convening, naturally, in Las Vegas--is the buzzword people don't say anymore.