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Cory Booker: Mayors Know How to Cooperate

Newark\'s Mayor has long been considered one of the most promising politicians of his generation. Now, with a $100 million education grant from Facebook, he\'s hoping to become one of the most influential.

Personal Genomics Tests to Face Regulation

The FDA has sent letters to five personal genomics companies outlining its intentions for regulation of direct-to-consumer tests, and if 23andMe thought it was having a bad week before, it's sure not going to be happy now.

Marshmallow Boy vs. The Pokemon Kid – The Neuroscience of Children's Passions

If I could use subtitles on this blog, this one would read: Why the most famous study of child-distraction is itself a huge distraction.But give me a minute to set this up.Over at The Daily Beast today, I have an essay about how Pokemon changed my son\'s brain. Or at least that\'s how The Daily Beast is packaging the story. The real point of the article is that my son\'s passion changed his brain. Passion, or motivation, is experienced by the brain as the spritz of dopamine. Dopamine increases...

America's 25 Hot Schools

Competition's intense and there are scores of colleges. Large, small, public, private, urban, rural—what's best for you? Here are our top picks for the places that everyone's talking about for 2005.

25 Hottest Universities

College Guide: It's that time of year again, when high-school seniors and their parents gear up for the admissions game. In excerpts from our annual newsstand issue, here's what you need to know about the newest trends.

World of Knowledge

As never before in their long history, universities have become instruments of national competition as well as instruments of peace. They are the locus of the scientific discoveries that move economies forward, and the primary means of educating the talent required to obtain and maintain competitive advantage. But at the same time, the opening of national borders to the flow of goods, services, information and especially people has made universities a powerful force for global integration,...

15 Ideas to Recharge America

can the united statesremain competitive in the changing global environment? NEWSWEEK asked 15 leaders in the fields of science, technology, education and business to assess the challenges we face and to offer some solutions. Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists from Silicon Valley addressed the issue of how immigration policies help--and hurt--our competitiveness; educators from the East spoke of the need to beef up basic skills like math and science in our schools, and to re-create the scope...

Plain Text: Technology Alone Can't Save Us

On Oct. 4, 1994, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake struck the Kuril Islands north of Japan. It killed 10 people, injured hundreds more and generated a giant tsunami that raced across the Pacific Ocean. The waves were quickly detected by tsunami-tracking stations in Japan and the United States, and an alert was sent to Pacific nations: evacuate your beaches and prepare for destructive waves. Hours later, when the waves finally hit the Hawaiian city of Hilo, thousands of miles away, residents were...

AMERICA'S 25 HOT SCHOOLS

COMPETITION'S INTENSE AND THERE ARE SCORES OF COLLEGES. LARGE, SMALL, PUBLIC, PRIVATE, URBAN, RURAL--WHAT'S BEST FOR YOU? HERE ARE OUR TOP PICKS FOR THE PLACES THAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT FOR 2005

Brazil's Racial Revolution

One day, some years ago, Brazilian Bishop Dom Jose Maria Pires sat down to lunch and a pile of unread mail. One letter, from black seminarians, caught his eye. It asked Pires to speak about the plight of blacks in the Roman Catholic Church. Racism was still a tender subject, and affirmative action practically unheard of. Pires, Brazil's ranking black clergyman, was delighted. "How nice that our brothers are taking up the question of race," he said out loud. "But Dom Jose," his housekeeper...

Love, Death And Light

Everything I do is arduous," Sally Mann says as she coats a glass plate with collodion and ether, just the way photographers did it 150 years ago. "Why do I do that? I don't know. Not because I'm better than anyone else..." Mann has always used unwieldy large-format bellows cameras with 19th-century brass-rimmed lenses, equipment so crude that she uses her hand--the only digital thing in sight--as the shutter. A few years ago, she raised the bar when she began working with these collodion...

Love, Death, Light

"Everything I do is arduous," Sally Mann says as she coats a glass plate with collodion and ether, just the way photographers did it 150 years ago. "Why do I do that? I don't know. Not because I'm better than anyone else... " Mann always used unwieldy large-format bellows cameras with 19th-century brass-rimmed lenses, equipment so crude that she uses her hand--the only digital thing in sight--as the shutter. A few years ago, she raised the bar another several notches when she began working with...

Q&Amp;A: Are Games Good?

Videogames are a hotly debated topic among parents and psychologists. But despite all the noise over the effects that gaming has on behavior, Steve Jones, senior research fellow at Pew Internet & American Life Project, says he has found very little data on the various behaviors of the game players themselves.Jones and his fellow researchers conducted a study of gaming among college students in 2002, the results of which have just been released. Among their findings: 65 percent of students...

Daring To Be Different

Tests aren't the only way to judge a high school. In the past decade, educators around the country have created dozens of intriguing models for reform. They include virtual high schools where all classes are online and "theme" schools based on environmental issues or the health-care profession. These schools tend to have "a strong identity shared by families and faculty alike," says Thomas Toch, writer-in-residence at the National Center on Education and the Economy and author of "High Schools...

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