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Robbing the Rich in L.A.

The latest Los Angeles crime spree might make a good caper movie. A crew of two, maybe three, shadowy burglars figures out how to break into million-dollar mansions dotting the pricey hillsides above L.A.

Ali Farzat: Arab Cartoonist and Gadfly

Ali Farzat, Syria's best-known political cartoonist, began publishing Al-Doumari, the country's first independent satirical weekly in 2001. Although Syrian President Bashar al-Assad had initially encouraged Farzat's efforts, he soon soured on the experiment.

Last Word: Hoshyar Zebari

Baghdad was already feeling the heat of an increase in suicide blasts and roadside bombs, mortar attacks on the Green Zone, and U.S. pressure to meet its "benchmarks" of progress by September.

Toddler served margarita in sippy cup

Elisa Kelly thought she was doing the right thing when she bought $340 worth of beer and liquor for her 16-year-old son and more than 20 of his friends. In exchange for the booze, Kelly's son agreed that all his pals would sleep over at his birthday party.

Oops. The Movie's Leaked Online

Michael Moore's new documentary about America's health-care system and pharmaceutical industry may be called "Sicko," but chances are he's the one feeling a little queasy today.

Full Speed Ahead

Lindsay Lohan is back in rehab. Back? Wasn't she just there? Fellow bad girl Britney Spears wasn't in long enough for her hair to grow back. Meanwhile, Paris Hilton zipped right by rehab and picked up the GO DIRECTLY TO JAIL card.In the last year or so, rehab has become the ultimate publicity tool, a brief break from the glitzy life, a chance to burnish one's reputation. (The bad girls aren't alone in this regard; see Mel Gibson, Isaiah Washington.) What we've forgotten is that rehab is...

Samuelson: Seeking Sense on Immigration

Our stalled immigration debate needs more common sense and more common decency. America's immigration system is unquestionably broken. It encourages illegality, frustrates assimilation and barely aids the economy—exactly the opposite of what it should do.

He's Ready to Rumble

John Edwards played defensive back in high school, and waiting offstage to speak, he looked eager to get onto the field and hit someone. That is what he did (rhetorically) in the first scrimmage of the 2008 presidential campaign last Friday.

The New Middle East

As the Iraq war helps bring the American era to a close, a new order will begin to emerge in the region.

Samuelson: Let's Not Hide Health Costs

We are awash in health-care proposals. President Bush has one. So does California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden has a plan, as does a coalition led by Families USA (a liberal advocacy group) and America's Health Insurance Plans (a trade group).

Drop Those Pounds!

There comes a moment, some time in your 40s, when you climb on the scale and have an epiphany: What you used to refer to as your "high" weight (when only your "fat" jeans fit) has become your average weight.

Why the Frogs Are Dying

Draped like a verdant shawl over Costa Rica's Tilarán Mountains, the Monteverde cloud forest has long been a nature lover's idyll. Hidden birds flirt to the whisper of rushing streams and epiphytes tumble from the mist, while delicate flowers bloom impossibly from the jungle's maw.

Fed Up With Kim?

Nobody likes dealing with Kim Jong Il anymore, including those countries closestto Pyongyang. South Korea, which has for years tried to placate the North, nowadays casts a more jaundiced eye on its communist brother.

25 New Ivies

The nation's elite colleges these days include more than Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Why? It's the tough competition for all the top students. That means a range of schools are getting fresh bragging rights.

America's 25 New Elite 'Ivies'

The nation's elite colleges these days include more than Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Why? It's the tough competition for all the top students. That means a range of schools are getting fresh bragging rights.

Wi-Fi Fever

Last year, St. Cloud, Fla., seemed poised to become an unlikely high-tech beacon. The small suburb of Orlando (population: 28,000) paid $2.6 million to build a wireless network that would blanket its 15 square miles in free, fast Internet access.

Isle of Denial

Moments after New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin won reelection with the smallest margin in modern mayoral history, he took the podium at the Marriott ballroom and proclaimed: "This is a great day for the city of New Orleans." We are, he said, "ready to take off."Well, nine months after Katrina and only days before the next hurricane season begins, one would hope.

What Makes a High School Great?

Gold stars: The answer depends on the school, and the student. With its annual list, NEWSWEEK honors top schools that help regular kids succeed in college. From the issue dated May 8, 2006. Click here to read Newsweek's 2007 Top High Schools coverage.

Turning Un-Japanese

To someone who has lived for long periods of time in the West, there is nothing particularly challenging about Japan, not anymore

Islam and Power

George W. Bush is not a man for second thoughts, but even he might have had some recently. Ever since 9/11, Bush has made the promotion of democracy in the Middle East the center-piece of his foreign policy, and doggedly pushed the issue.

Our Bodies, Our Wires

In his gadget-filled office at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Prof. Kohji Mitsubayashi tells a visitor to touch a transmitter with one hand and a receiver with another.

Getting Your Body (And Soul) Wired

In his gadget-filled office at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Prof. Kohji Mitsubayashi tells a visitor to touch a transmitter with one hand and a receiver with another.

A Very Lonely Japan

The Japanese tend to expect diplomatic bouquets from even the most insignificant of their foreign visitors. So imagine the audience reaction when German ex-chancellor Helmut Schmidt, invited to give a lecture in Tokyo last month, treated his hosts to an exercise in bluntness.

THE BATTLE TO REBUILD

The Lower Ninth was going under, again. Floodwaters from Hurricane Rita had breached the levee along the Industrial Canal, inundating the poor New Orleans neighborhood that is, or was, home to 40,000 African-Americans.

Turkish Delight

After So Many Decades Of Trying To Become Western, Istanbul Glories In The Rediscovery Of A Very Modern Identity. European Or Not, It Is One Of The Coolest Cities In The World.

The Deadliest Cancer

Lung cancer kills more Americans than any other type of malignancy—and some of the victims never smoked. But despite grim statistics there is some good news: fresh research offers hope for earlier diagnosis and more-effective treatments.

RUSTIC LUXURY

Travel used to be divided into two basic categories: luxury and no-frills. the former consisted of flying first class, dining at three-star restaurants and staying in decadent comfort; the latter involved backpacking and camping out in some of the world's most beautifully remote spots.

Frugal Is So Over

In the pie-chart world of macroeconomics, it is once again fashionable to bash Asia's "absent" consumers. Americans, we are told, tap easy credit to live beyond their means.

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