SpaceX NASA Launch Livestream: How and When to Watch Crewed Mission to ISS Take Off Live Online

UPDATE: May 27, 4:21 p.m. EST — Wednesday's rocket launch was delayed due to weather. The launch was rescheduled for Saturday.

Original story:

NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Doug Hurley are set to lift-off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket in what will be the first crewed launch from American soil in nearly a decade.

The landmark mission to the International Space Station (ISS,) dubbed "Crew Dragon Demo-2," is the first crewed launch that Elon musk's company has ever performed. It gives astronauts their first chance to experience the Falcon 9 and test the next-generation Crew Dragon spacecraft, which to date has only completed one unmanned flight to the ISS.

If you would like to follow the launch, which is scheduled for 4:33 p.m. EDT, there are several options available.

NASA itself will be providing coverage of the event on the space agency's TV channel, which can be streamed through a variety of platforms to televisions, computers and mobile devices.

You can head to the NASA Live area here, or the space agency's YouTube channel here. You can also download the NASA App for iOS or Android on your phone.

You can also stream NASA's coverage from the space agencies various social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitch.tv.

Watch NASA and SpaceX Launch Astronauts to Space!

Watch history unfold as NASA and SpaceX launch astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley to the @ISS on Wednesday, May 27. This mission marks the first time since the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011 that humans will fly to the space station from U.S. soil.Set a reminder to tune for joint NASA/SpaceX coverage starting at 12:15 p.m. EDT, with liftoff currently targeted for 4:33 p.m. EDT. 🚀

Posted by NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration on Tuesday, May 26, 2020

"This launch represents the realization of a decades' long dream to migrate part of human space exploration to private companies," former NASA astronaut Mike Massimino told Newsweek. "Up until now it has only been governments that have launched people into space. From now on it will be private companies as well. Similar to when the first commercial airline flights began, I think the world will be changed forever.

"Watching the launch will be exciting, but understanding the passion and dedication of the thousands of people that made it possible will be inspiring. It will be a blast of good news which is needed at this difficult time."

NASA's stream will begin at 12 p.m. EDT on May 27 with live views of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket on Launch Pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center, followed by coverage of the mission.

At 7:30 p.m., NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine will take part in a post-launch news conference.

SpaceX, Falcon 9 rocket
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with the Crew Dragon atop, stands poised for launch at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 21, 2020, ahead of the Demo-2 mission. NASA/Kim Shiflett

The coverage of the event will also continue the following day—beginning at 7:20 a.m. EDT—when the astronauts will dock with the ISS and enter the space station.

It is also possible to view the NASA TV stream on your television via other apps or third-party services including Roku, Pluto TV, Hulu, DirectTV, DISH Network and Google Fiber. NASA TV can also be found on Satellite Galaxy 13 for those with satellite reception equipment.

Aside from the official NASA coverage, Discovery and Science channels will be providing a simulcast beginning at 2 p.m. EDT featuring interviews with Massimino, Bridenstine and other notable figures, such as active NASA astronaut Jessica Meir. Viewers can watch on the channels themselves or by downloading the Discovery GO app.

Similarly, National Geographic and ABC News will be collaborating to provide a two-hour live streaming event that kicks off at 3:00 p.m. EDT. Their coverage will also continue on May 28, when the Crew Dragon spacecraft is expected to dock with the ISS. Viewers can watch the stream on all devices via the NGTV app, NatGeoTV.com, Hulu and YouTube, as well as On Demand on cable and satellite providers.