A Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge Cast Member Said They Don't Say 'Younglings' Because Of The Child Murders

Update (6/7/19 5:20 p.m.): In response to our request for comment, Disneyland says that cast members do not avoid the word "younglings." "Our cast members use that word daily in the new land, Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge, as part of the interaction with guests," Disney officials said in a statement to Newsweek.

A guest to Disneyland's newly opened Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge reports cast members playing Star Wars characters at Disney's Black Spire Outpost don't use the word "younglings" because of all the child murder in Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith.

There are few bigger Star Wars fans than movie YouTuber Jenny Nicholson, who has already been to Galaxy's Edge twice, including a visit prior to its May 31 official opening in Anaheim, California's Disneyland Resort. (A Disney World version of Galaxy's Edge will open in Orlando, Florida in August.) Nicholson shared impressions of the park on Twitter, where she pointed out a number of characters and creatures populating the new Star Wars theme park, including the dianoga from the Death Star trash compactor (and the sewers of Coruscant) and rocking horses modeled after Canto Bight's racing fathiers, introduced in The Last Jedi.

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"Star Wars": Galaxy's Edge will only be accessible with reservations from May 31 through June 23. The Walt Disney Co.

Nicholson also praised Galaxy's Edge's expansive cast, many of whom had elaborate backstories for how their character ended up Black Spire Outpost, a rough-and-tumble spaceport on the planet Outer Rims planet of Batuu. Think of it as a more jungly Mos Eisley, from the original Star Wars.

I forgot to put this on my list, the other best part of Star Wars Land was the CAST MEMBERS who are very into it, doing space hairdos/makeup (saw a lot of rainbow highlighter), telling you the lore, making up their own OCs and remembering you when you come back

— Jenny Nicholson (@JennyENicholson) May 27, 2019

But one interaction with a Galaxy's Edge cast member reveals the extensive preparation and forethought that goes into being a cast member at Disneyland's new Star Wars attraction. While speaking with a costumed cast member, Nicholson discovered that cast members have been instructed against using the word "younglings"—a generic term for children in the Star Wars galaxy.

Also a cast member said "kids" and I jokingly said "oh, younglings?" and she blindsided me by telling me they're already scrubbing "younglings" from the vocab. Parents didn't like it because one of the only times you hear it in the movies is the phrase "killing younglings." Fair.

— Jenny Nicholson (@JennyENicholson) May 31, 2019

It may sound like an arbitrary stricture, but the apparent cast member rule is grounded in a pivotal moment from the Star Wars Prequel Trilogy. The term "younglings" is most often used in the Star Wars movies in reference to trainees at the Jedi Temple who aren't old enough to be a Padawan apprentice to a Jedi Master. Yoda is seen instructing younglings in Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones. But "younglings" likely evokes a very different scene to anyone familiar with the prequels.

In Revenge of the Sith, Anakin Skywalker (Hayden Christensen) is turned to the Dark Side by Supreme Chancellor (soon-to-be Galactic Emperor) Palpatine (Ian McDiarmid). Palpatine's first instruction to the newly christened Darth Vader is to kill every single Jedi. Backed by Clone Troopers, Vader marches into the Jedi Temple, where a slaughter commences. He doesn't spare the young ones, leading to one of the darkest moments in any Star Wars movie:

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It's easy to see why Disney would prefer the more generic "kids," a word also used several times throughout the Star Wars movies.

I assume that one lead or manager experienced guest dissatisfaction with the word, and told their cast at that one shift not to go around using it. And then sent like an email about it to the rest of their department leads, who ignored it, and nobody escalated it

— Jenny Nicholson (@JennyENicholson) June 9, 2019

This article has been updated to include comment from representatives from Disneyland and additional context from Nicholson. Both were asked for comment prior to publication. The headline has been altered to more closely reflect the information they provided about cast members' use of the term.