Flash Flood Watch, Warning Update As Over 30 People Missing in North Carolina

More than 30 people remain unaccounted for in a North Carolina county following flash flooding that devastated the state when the remnants of Tropical Depression Fred hit the area.

In an executive order issuing a state of emergency in the state on Wednesday, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper confirmed that "officials in Haywood County estimate approximately 30 people are currently missing" following the storm that hit the area on Tuesday.

"Nearly a foot of rain has fallen over the past three days in some areas of Western North Carolina, from the remnants of Tropical Storm Fred and the rains that preceded it, and record flooding is occurring," the governor said.

Cooper confirmed that at least 98 people had already been rescued from floodwaters in North Carolina and said that "more than 250 responders from across the state are involved in the search and rescue effort," including "National Guard and Highway Patrol helicopter crews."

According to local station WLOS, four children attending facilities part of Haywood County Schools were unable to return home on Tuesday due to the storm and officials looked after them throughout the night.

Pictures shared on social media from areas affected by the remnants of Fred on Tuesday showed several houses destroyed and cars hit by falling trees, while roads were flooded and had to be closed across the state.

During a press conference on Wednesday, Haywood County Emergency Services Director Travis Donaldson confirmed that "ongoing search and rescue efforts" are happening in the affected areas to find those still unaccounted for.

Cooper confirmed that "Haywood, Jackson, McDowell, Madison, Mitchell, Rutherford, Transylvania and Yancey counties have all declared local states of emergency" due to the storm, and said that utility companies were working to bring power back to residents after around 50,000 went without on Tuesday.

A power outage map provided by PowerOutage.US on Thursday morning showed that a majority of customers in North Carolina had seen their power restored, with only 2,981 still affected.

Storm Fred hit the U.S. at around 2:15 p.m. CDT on Monday with wind speeds recorded of up to 65 miles per hour, just short of the 74 miles per hour needed to be classified as a hurricane.

Fred was later downgraded to a tropical depression as its wind speeds decreased when it traveled north, but brought flooding to several states including Florida, as AccuWeather reported that several people had to be rescued from flooded homes in the state as power lines fell.

At least one man died as a result of Fred when his car hydroplaned near Panama City, Florida, Monday night and overturned into a ditch.

The National Hurricane Center is monitoring several storms, including Hurricane Grace and Tropical Storm Henri, with the former expected to hit Mexico in the coming days and the latter likely to affect parts of New England.

Newsweek has contacted Cooper's office for comment.

Flooding in North Carolina
A flooded park is seen in Rodanthe as Hurricane Dorian hits Cape Hatteras in North Carolina on September 6, 2019. More than 30 people remain unaccounted for in a North Carolina county following flash flooding that devastated the state when the remnants of Tropical Depression Fred flooded hit the area. Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images