'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate' GameCube-style Controller Review: PDP Wired Fight Pad Feels Great

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is out now, and if you are like me, you've been playing Smash Bros. games since the original debuted on N64. Thanks to Super Smash Bros. Melee and Brawl, I got used to playing the series with a GameCube controller. (It's also the best controller design yet for a game console, but that's a different argument for a different article.)

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The Pikachu-themed Switch wired fight pad, featuring the alternate C-stick nub PDP

When the PDP wired fight pads for the Nintendo Switch arrived, I was ecstatic. I don't have a fancy Switch Pro Controller, so playing in the office usually meant I was stuck with a single sideways Joy-Con. I don't have particularly large hands, but even I feel too cramped with one of those.

Enter the PDP controller, which is shaped almost exactly like the GameCube controller. The only major difference I noticed is with the back triggers. The GameCube's L and R buttons have that great pressure-sensing sink to them, with the final click in right at the bottom. The PDP controller's similar buttons just click in without the sinking.

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The biggest difference between the PDP controller and a GameCube controller is the configuration of the buttons on top PDP

The controller's overall feel around the top is also modified to fit your middle fingers on the bottom two L and R buttons, with your index fingers reserved for the smaller two buttons at the top. I always played the GameCube with my index fingers on the bigger L and R buttons, so this took some minor adjustments to get used to.

Of course, because these controllers are made for the Switch, some additional buttons are required, including the plus and minus buttons along with the Home button. These are all lumped together where the Start button was on the GameCube controller. While it's a smart placement, I found the buttons themselves a little hard to reach and press. Thankfully, these buttons typically aren't used actively in Switch games.

Setting up the fight pads isa breeze, and using the Switch dock allows you to have up to three controllers plugged in at once. The controllers all feature a USB port on the end, and work as soon as you plug them in.

The controller is also slightly customizable. The smaller C-stick can be replaced with a nub the same size as the left analog stick. This is a great option if you've ever found the C-stick to be annoyingly small. The nubs pop off and can be swapped easily, no extra tools needed.

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A look at the Mario-themed Switch wired fight pad PDP

If you're looking for an inexpensive way to play with a GameCube controller on your Switch, the PDP wired fight pads are a great option. They feel almost identical to the GameCube controller, are incredibly simple to use and work great. The slight changes to the controller's shape might throw some people off their game, but it's a minor enough adjustment that didn't bother me too much.

The PDP wired fight pads come in three different themes: Mario, Pikachu and The Legend of Zelda. The latter features the image of Link's Hylian shield in the middle. The controllers are currently available for $25.

So what do you think? Are you interested in the PDP wired fight pads for your next Smash session? What controller do you prefer to play with when using a Switch? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate' GameCube-style Controller Review: PDP Wired Fight Pad Feels Great | Gaming