Tornado Survivor Recounts Ordeal Below Rubble: 'I Did Not Think I Was Going to Make It'

A survivor of the deadly storms in Kentucky that struck Friday said she was trapped under five feet of debris for two hours after a candle factory collapsed with dozens of workers inside.

Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear said Saturday said that "at least dozens" died after the roof of the candle factory in Mayfield, Kentucky collapsed when a tornado hit Friday.

Speaking on TODAY, Kyanna Parsons-Perez, who was in the building when it collapsed, said that the event was "absolutely the most terrifying thing I've ever experienced in my life." Parsons-Perez also live-streamed her experience on social media following the collapse.

Parsons-Perez said that employees were "in the area where you go in case there's a storm."

"And we were all there, and then the lights got to flickering and all of a sudden...we could feel the wind, and then my ears kind of start popping as they would as if you're on a plane, and then we did like a little rock—this way, and this way— and then everything came down on us," Parsons-Perez said.

She said that she could hear people screaming and praying. She called 911, and then went live on Facebook.

"Later, I went live because I was trying to stay calm, and keep everybody else calm and trying to get us as much help as possible," Parsons-Perez added.

Tornado Survivor Recounts Ordeal Below Rubble
A survivor of the deadly storms in Kentucky said she was trapped under five feet of debris for two hours, after a candle factory collapsed with dozens of workers inside. Here, emergency workers search what is left of the Mayfield Consumer Products Candle Factory after it was destroyed by a tornado in Mayfield, Kentucky on December 11. John Amis

Parsons-Perez said she was trapped for at least two hours and said that when a search and rescue official arrived to aid her, he said that she was under about five feet of rubble.

"I did not think I was going to make it at all. I was so scared, I was trying to stay positive," she told TODAY.

She eventually made it out of the building and said she had to "climb up out of the building to get out from everything that fell on us."

Beshear said that 110 people had been in the candle factory at the time the tornado struck.

"This has been the most devastating tornado event in our state's history," Beshear said during a Saturday press conference.

The Associated Press reported that crews were using heavy machinery to move rubble at the factory site. Officials didn't know as of Saturday morning how many bodies had been recovered.

"We have been working tirelessly through the night,"Jeremy Creason, Mayfield's fire chief and EMS director told the AP.

"We had to at times crawl over casualties to get to live victims to get them out."