Everything We Know So Far About Tropical Storm Danny

Live Updates

Tropical Storm Danny which formed off the South Carolina-Georgia coast Monday is expected to make landfall within the next couple hours and weaken rapidly once hitting the coast. This is the fourth named storm of the 2021 hurricane season.

At 3 p.m., the National Hurricane Center reclassified the then-tropical depression as a tropical storm using Doppler radar and Air Force reports of sustained winds at 40 mph. The latest NHC advisory at 5 p.m. showed the maximum sustained winds had strengthened to 45 mph, with higher gusts.

The storm was located was located 35 miles from both South Carolina's Beaufort and Charleston when the latest advisory was released. The storm is expected to hit the South Carolina coast Monday evening and continue moving into east-central Georgia through Tuesday morning.

The NHC reported that tropical-storm-force winds reach outward from Danny's center for up to 35 miles. Additionally, the 5 p.m. report stated that the coast may begin seeing tropical storm conditions "very soon."

However, the center projects the now-confirmed tropical storm will weaken rapidly once it makes landfall.

Tropical storm warnings were issued earlier Monday for the parts of the South Carolina coast. The 11 a.m. advisory released by the NHC said that heavy rainfall is possible "from coastal southern South Carolina and Georgia, inland across the Piedmont of Georgia into northeast Alabama."

Urban areas within the southern South Carolina and Georgia coasts may see isolated flooding, the NHC reported. The South Carolina coast can also expect "life-threatening surf and rip currents" later in the day.

The Georgia and southern South Carolina coasts could see one to three inches of rain later on Monday. The NHC said that these areas have been dry recently, mitigating concern for widespread flooding from the storm. However, the center did not rule out the possibility of local flooding in urban areas around the coast.

Beyond the Georgia and South Carolina coasts, inland areas could see one to two inches of rain "across upstate South Carolina, the Piedmont of Georgia, and into northeastern Alabama," the NHC reported.

Forecasters have been tracking a tropical disturbance in the central Atlantic Ocean, in addition to the tropical depression. An NHC outlook report released Monday morning described the disturbance as a "broad area of low pressure associated with a tropical wave," generating a small group of showers and thunderstorms in its Atlantic path.

The disturbance is moving west to northwest at about 20 mph, and will likely reach the Lesser Antilles, a group of Caribbean islands, by Wednesday night. This system has a 20 percent chance of developing into a depression in the next 48 hours, and a 40 percent chance of developing into a depression in the next five days.

The NHC will release its next intermediate advisory at 8 p.m. and its next complete advisory at 11 p.m.

The live updates for this event have concluded.

Tropical Storm Danny
Tropical Storm Danny was 35 miles from coastal South Carolina and Georgia at 5 p.m. (EDT) and is expected to make landfall in the next couple hours. NOAA

The center of Tropical Storm Danny was located 35 miles from both South Carolina's Beaufort and Charleston at 5 p.m. (EDT), according to the latest NHC advisory. The storm is expected to hit the South Carolina coast Monday evening and continue moving into east-central Georgia through Tuesday morning.

The NHC reported that tropical-storm-force winds reach outward from Danny's center for up to 35 miles. Additionally, the 5 p.m. report stated that the coast may begin seeing tropical storm conditions "very soon."

NOAA Doppler radar data showed an increase of maximum sustained wind speeds to about 45 mph, with higher gusts. The NHC doesn't expect wind speeds to change again until the storm makes landfall, when forecasters predict it will weaken quickly.

An isolated tornado will be possible Monday evening along the South Carolina coast, the advisory said. The NHC will release its next intermediate advisory at 8 p.m. and its next complete advisory at 11 p.m.

Tropical Storm Danny is expected to make landfall near Charleston between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. local time, ABC News reported.

Various coastal cities in South Carolina and Georgia have issued weather warnings in anticipation of the storm. The Charleston Police Department's Twitter page stated that drivers should take precautions when driving, such as bypassing flooded areas and staying vigilant of road barricades.

Tropical Depression Four is anticipated to bring wind and rain to the Charleston area this evening. While all our residents are used to coping with rain here in South Carolina; CPD reminds drivers to avoid flooded areas, obey our officers and be attentive to road barricades. pic.twitter.com/mJ9RSd7C8l

— Charleston P.D. (@CharlestonPD) June 28, 2021

The Myrtle Beach Fire Department's Twitter page announced that city beaches were flying double red flags, signaling hazardous surf zone conditions, as they brace for the storm to make landfall. The National Weather Service also issued a warning about high rip current risks for the coastal city and beach destination.

The National Weather Service has issued the following beach hazard statement for Monday, June 28th: High RIP current risk expected due to a disturbance off the SC/Georgia coast. pic.twitter.com/d99djunZR5

— Myrtle Beach Fire Dept (@MyrtleBeachFire) June 28, 2021

The fourth tropical depression of the 2021 hurricane season has strengthened into the season's fourth named storm, Tropical Storm Danny.

The depression needed to sustain wind speeds of at least 39 mph to be classified as a tropical storm. Doppler radar data from Charleston, SC, as well as data from the Air Force Reserve aircraft deployed to investigate the then-depression, found that the system had sustained winds of 40 mph, with higher gusts.

One Weatherflow station in Folly Beach, SC, documented a wind gust of 41 mph, the NHC said.

At 3:05 p.m. (EDT), the storm was 60 miles from Beaufort, SC, and 45 miles from Charleston, an NHC report said. The system is currently moving west-northwest at 16 mph.

305pm EDT 28 June -- Recent doppler radar data from Charleston, SC & preliminary Air Force recon aircraft data indicates that #TD4 has strengthened into Tropical Storm #Danny with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph.

More: https://t.co/bwAEkmMNBW pic.twitter.com/KuWofdrJFU

— National Hurricane Center (@NHC_Atlantic) June 28, 2021

The tropical depression's center was located by the Air Force Reserve aircraft deployed earlier Monday to investigate it, according to the NHC's 2 p.m. (EDT) intermediate advisory.

The depression is moving west-northwest at 16 mph and is expected to maintain this pace or one similar over the next couple days, the NHC said. Forecasters believe it will hit the South Carolina coasts, where tropical storm warnings are in effect, "later this evening."

Maximum sustained winds are still sitting around 35 mph, while the NHC still projects the tropical depression will develop into a tropical storm before it makes landfall.

The aircraft is currently investigating the depression, the NHC said. The center will release its next complete advisory at 5:00 p.m.

Tropical Depression #Four Advisory 1A: Reconnaissance Aircraft Investigating Tropical Depression Located Just Offshore the Coast of South Carolina. https://t.co/VqHn0u1vgc

— National Hurricane Center (@NHC_Atlantic) June 28, 2021

Forecasters have been tracking a tropical disturbance in the central Atlantic Ocean, in addition to the tropical depression headed for the South Carolina and Georgia coasts

An NHC outlook report released Monday morning described the second disturbance as a "broad area of low pressure associated with a tropical wave," generating a small group of showers and thunderstorms in its Atlantic path. The disturbance is moving west to northwest at about 20 mph, and will likely reach the Lesser Antilles, a group of Caribbean islands, by Wednesday night.

Forecasters believe some slow development for the disturbance could take place throughout the week. The system has a 20% chance of developing into a depression in the next 48 hours, and a 40% chance of developing into a depression in the next five days.

Second Tropical Disturbance
An NOAA outlook map shows the trajectory of the tropical depression expected to hit the South Carolina-Georgia coasts Monday, and a tropical disturbance in the central tropical Atlantic Ocean that may hit the Lesser Antilles by Wednesday night.

The NHC has deployed an Air Force Reserve Unit reconnaissance aircraft to investigate the tropical depression as it makes its way toward the South Carolina-Georgia coast.

The official Twitter page for the Hurricane Hunters, a squadron specifically for weather surveillance, posted a video of the aircraft's takeoff along with the announcement of its departure.

"Excuse me, Atlantic Ocean, we're flying to contact you about your Tropical Depression 4's atmospheric data," the tweet read.

The aircraft will spend five hours investigating areas affected by the tropical depression, News4Jax reported.

📞Excuse me, Atlantic Ocean, we're flying to contact you about your Tropical Depression 4's atmospheric data.

We have a crew on their way to #TD4 before it makes landfall on the East Coast. Remember to heed warnings and stay weather aware!#ReserveReady pic.twitter.com/mwWXVzoovj

— Hurricane Hunters (@53rdWRS) June 28, 2021