Tropical Storm Grace and Henri Path Updates as Storms Increase in Strength

Storm Grace has been reclassified as a tropical storm as it continues to make its way through the Caribbean, while Tropical Storm Henri is strengthening out in the Atlantic.

Tropical Storm Grace was upgraded from a tropical depression on Tuesday morning, with wind speeds recorded of up to 45mph, according to an advisory from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

The worst of the storm is expected to pass over Haiti on Tuesday morning before crossing into Cuba and Jamaica in the afternoon, with the NHC issuing a Tropical Storm Warning for the latter in an upgrade from the previous Tropical Storm Watch.

A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere in the predicted area within 36 hours, while a Tropical Storm Watch is created when the conditions are possible.

Haiti has already felt some of the effect of Grace over the past couple of days, but the worst of the storm is heading toward a part of the country that is recovering from the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that devastated the Caribbean island on Saturday.

On Sunday, Jerry Chandler, head of Haiti's civil protection agency, told CNN he's "worried about the upcoming storm as it can complicate the situation for us," after the country saw close to 1,500 people die following the earthquake the day before.

The storm is expected to hit Haiti with between five to 10 inches of rainfall on Tuesday, which could lead to flash flooding and mudslides forming on the island, according to the NHC.

Through Wednesday, parts of Cuba, Jamaica and the Cayman Islands are expected to be hit with between three and six inches of rain before the storm continues its journey to Mexico later in the week.

Storm Grace map
A map of the expected route of Tropical Storm Grace provided by the National Hurricane Center on Tuesday August 17. National Hurricane Center

A map of the projected path of Grace, published by the NHC on Tuesday morning, showed that the storm is expected to hit the Mexican coast on Wednesday before continuing through parts of the country until Friday.

In the advisory on Tuesday morning, the NHC said that a Hurricane Watch had been put in effect for the "Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico from Cabo Catoche to Punta Allen," as hurricane conditions are possible when Grace hits Mexico later in the week.

Grace is one of three storms currently being monitored by the NHC, the others being Fred and Henri, which is currently sitting in the Atlantic just off of Bermuda.

In an advisory on Tuesday morning, the NHC confirmed that Tropical Storm Henri had been recorded about 135 miles south-southeast of Bermuda with maximum wind speeds of up to 50 mph.

The center predicted that Henri could strengthen again in the next couple of days, but said that it's likely to miss Bermuda before moving northwest on Thursday.

Tropical Storm Henri
A map of the predicted movements of Tropical Storm Henri provided by the National Hurricane Center on Tuesday August 17. National Hurricane Center

As Mexico braces for Grace, Storm Fred, which has been downgraded to a tropical depression, continues to dump heavy rainfall in Florida and its neighboring states after making landfall in the U.S. on Monday.

The storm hit the Florida panhandle at around 2:15 p.m. CDT on Monday with wind speeds recorded of up to 65 mph, just short of the 74mph needed to be classified as a hurricane.

Fred brought flooding to several parts of Florida, as AccuWeather reported that several people had to be rescued from flooded homes in the state as power lines fell.

In an advisory on Tuesday morning, the NHC predicted that heavy rainfall from Fred will continue to hit Florida before moving into Georgia and Alabama, bringing flooding to those states.

Storm Grace
People ride on a motorcycle through a flooded street after the passage of the Tropical Storm Grace in Santo Domingo, on August 16, 2021. Storm Grace has been reclassified as a tropical storm as it continues to make its way through the Caribbean. Erika SANTELICES/AFP via Getty Images