Tropical Storm Teddy to Become 'Powerful Hurricane' This Week

Tropical Storm Teddy joins four other "active tropical cyclones" currently in the Atlantic Basin, the National Weather Service (NWS) noted Monday.

Teddy, which strengthened from a tropical depression into a tropical storm, is "expected to become a powerful hurricane later this week," forecast to develop into a hurricane in two days, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) confirmed Monday.

No coastal watches or warnings are in effect at this time, according to the latest report Monday by the NHC. But Tropical Storm Teddy is forecast to create "large swells" that are expected to reach the Lesser Antilles region of the Caribbean and the northeastern coast of South America by Wednesday. "These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions," the NHC warned.

A tropical cyclone is a low pressure system that forms over tropical or sub-tropical waters. A tropical depression has maximum sustained surface winds of 38 miles per hour (mph) or less, while the maximum for a tropical storm ranges from 39-73 mph. A hurricane has maximum sustained surface winds of 74 mph or higher, the NWS explains.

Tropical Storm Teddy's maximum sustained winds have reached nearly 40 mph, with higher gusts, and additional strengthening expected.

"Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles (75 km) from the center," the NHC report explained.

"Teddy is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 km/h). A continued west-northwestward motion is expected for the next day or two followed by a turn toward the northwest by mid-week," the NHC added.

Not 1, not 2, not 3, not 4, but 5...

5?

Yes, 5 active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Basin his morning.

Main concern for the U.S. is #Sally which is expected to bring storm surge and 12+ inches of rain from Eastern LA to the FL panhandle.https://t.co/1RsiXuC7Vj pic.twitter.com/HDzrOHuXaE

— National Weather Service (@NWS) September 14, 2020

There are "5 active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Basin this morning," the NWS noted in a post Monday on its official Twitter account. They include Tropical Storm Teddy, Tropical Storm Sally, Hurricane Paulette, Tropical Depression Rene and Tropical Depression Twenty-one.

"Main concern for the U.S. is #Sally which is expected to bring storm surge and 12+ inches of rain from Eastern LA [Louisiana] to the FL [Florida] panhandle," the NWS added.

Tropical Storm Sally is "likely to produce life-threatening storm surge, hurricane-force winds and flash flooding," on parts of the northern Gulf Coast from late Monday, the NHC confirmed.

Echoing the thoughts of our colleagues on #wxtwitter, deep convection with Tropical Storm #Sally is producing a lot of gravity waves as seen by #GOESEast.

Think of it as dropping a large stone in water: ripples emanate outward. In the atmosphere, the stones are t-storms. pic.twitter.com/AjbD2iUCnD

— NHC_TAFB (@NHC_TAFB) September 14, 2020

Sally is forecast to have "significant water-related impacts," with a storm surge of up to 11 feet along the coast and 10 to 20 inches of rainfall, the NWS noted.

"There is a Marginal (1/5) risk for severe storms today [Monday] along portions of the Gulf Coast. Storms with damaging wind gusts, and perhaps a tornado, will be possible today as Tropical Storm Sally continues to move towards land," the NWS added.

The eye of Hurricane Paulette was said to be moving away from Bermuda, while "hurricane-force winds and torrential rains associated with the southern eyewall" were reported to be affecting the island, the NHC noted.

There is a Marginal (1/5) risk for severe storms today along portions of the Gulf Coast. Storms with damaging wind gusts, and perhaps a tornado, will be possible today as Tropical Storm Sally continues to move towards land. #FLwx #MSwx #LAwx pic.twitter.com/FM1qNYSvVr

— NWS Storm Prediction Center (@NWSSPC) September 14, 2020

Rene was reported to be "just hanging on as a tropical depression," while Tropical Depression Twenty-one on the far eastern portion of the Tropical Atlantic region was expected to be short-lived, according to the latest report Monday by the NHC.

"Disorganized showers and thunderstorms" in the western and southwestern Gulf of Mexico were reported to be currently associated with a weak area of low pressure.

"Development of this system is not expected due to strong upper-level winds while it moves slowly southwestward and then southward over the western Gulf of Mexico during the next few days," the NHC noted in its latest Tropical Weather Outlook report Monday.

The number of tropical storms and hurricanes rise significantly in August, peaking in mid-September and decreasing until early November, the NWS explains.

Hurricane Matthew Florida NOAA satellite October 2016
A satellite image of the Atlantic Ocean taken by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showing Hurricane Matthew beginning to make landfall in Florida on October 6, 2016. Tropical Storm Teddy is forecast to become a powerful hurricane this week. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images