Are Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un the Same Person? There's Photographic Evidence

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Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un both seem to enjoy large motor vehicles. Getty Images

Are Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un basically the same person? Evidence is mounting that they are, indeed, kindred spirits.

Not only do they both seemingly enjoy the prospect of a nuclear holocaust, the two leaders also really appreciate a good truck (or tractor)—as any large man-child would.

The following images seem to reveal just how similar these two men, made enemies by history and nationality, truly are.

Here's Kim on a tractor on November 15, apparently trading in his intercontinental ballistic missiles for farm equipment:

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Getty Images

And here's Trump gleefully sitting in a truck back in March:

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Getty Images

Here's one more photo of Kim, highly focused on driving the tractor:

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Getty Images

And another image of Trump in a truck, in which he seems to be re-enacting a scene from the blockbuster film Titanic:

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Getty Images

Beyond their love for large motor vehicles, experts have noticed similarities between Trump and Kim's rhetoric as the two leaders have exchanged threats and insults.

Over the summer, Trump warned the reclusive nation it would be met with "fire and fury like the world has never seen" if it continued to threaten the U.S. Responding to Trump's statement, former CIA analyst Bruce Klingner said, "It seems to be language written by the same speechwriters for Kim Jong Un. The language is very bombastic, it's over-the-top—I don't think it's helpful."

Similarly, Peter Feaver, who served as an adviser on President George W. Bush's National Security Council staff, told The New York Times Trump's choice of words was more "jingoistic" or nationalistic than what he's heard from presidents in the past, adding, "It borrows a little bit from the tone of the North Koreans."

Trump has continued to issue bombastic threats toward Kim and his regime despite such criticism. During his first address to the United Nations in late September, for example, Trump threatened to "totally destroy" North Korea if it forced the U.S. to defend itself or its allies. Kim—aka "Little Rocket Man"—responded by referring to Trump as a "dotard," which is an insulting term for an old, senile person. Pyongyang reiterated this insult as Trump finished up his first trip to Asia as president, during which North Korea claimed "mad dog" Trump "begged" for nuclear war. Trump offered a retort in a sarcastic tweet, calling Kim "short and fat."

Apparently enraged by Trump's recent statements, North Korea's state newspaper said the president "should know that he is just a hideous criminal sentenced to death by the Korean people."

Perhaps the two leaders have more in common than they might like to admit: A flair for the dramatic, adoration for large motor vehicles and a tendency to exchange school-yard insults.