Donald Trump is 'Threat to National Security' And 'Integrity of our Elections,' Says Constitutional Law Professor

As the Ukraine controversy continues to unfold, one constitutional law professor has asserted that President Donald Trump is a "threat to national security" and puts the country at risk every day he is in the Oval Office.

"The President is a threat to our national security, the integrity of our elections, and the rule of law. Every day he remains in office is an unacceptable risk," Richard Primus wrote on Twitter on Tuesday night. Primus is a law professor at the University of Michigan.

"I'm a big reasonable-disagreement guy. But sometimes there's a right side and wrong side. Now is one of those times," he added.

The President is a threat to our national security, the integrity of our elections, and the rule of law. Every day he remains in office is an unacceptable risk.

I'm a big reasonable-disagreement guy. But sometimes there's a right side and wrong side. Now is one of those times.

— Richard Primus (@Richard_Primus) October 2, 2019

The House of Representatives launched an official impeachment inquiry against Trump last week due to his questionable communication with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. In a July 25th phone call, the two leaders discussed former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter. It's been reported that Trump tried to pressure Zelensky into opening an investigation against his political rival.

The phone call was found so troubling by one member of the intelligence community that they filed an official whistleblower complaint with the inspector general. In the complaint, which was made public by the House Intelligence Committee, the whistleblower alleged Trump was "using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election."

Trump has acknowledged that he and Zelensky discussed the Bidens, but has denied any wrongdoing. A rough transcript of their July 25 phone call released by the White House does not show an explicit quid pro quo agreement between the two leaders for the investigation into the Bidens. But it's been reported that Trump withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine in the weeks around the call.

The president has slammed the impeachment inquiry as a "Democratic witch hunt." In one tweet, Trump quoted an evangelical pastor who compared removing the president to initiate a "civil war." Harvard Law professor John Coates argued that Trump's tweet itself was actually grounds for impeachment.

Public support for removing the president is growing, according to recent polls. Quinnipiac University recently found that support for impeachment grew by 10 points in one week. A survey shared by the college on Monday showed that 47 percent of respondents supported impeachment, up from 37 percent in the same poll conducted a week earlier.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has made the Ukraine whistleblower scandal and the Trump administration's attempts to cover it up the center of the Democrats' impeachment inquiry

"We could not ignore what the president did. He gave us no choice. So it wasn't any change of mind. I always said we will follow the facts where they take us. And when we see them, we will be ready. And we are ready," Pelosi told CBS on Sunday.

donald trump armed forces wlecome ceremony
President Donald Trump speaks during the Armed Forces Welcome Ceremony in honor of the Twentieth Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on September 30, 2019 at Summerall Field, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Virginia. Trump is facing an impeachment inquiry amid reports that he pressured Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images