Trump Tweets Legal Advice from Diamond and Silk to Support Voter Fraud Allegations

President Donald Trump on Saturday night tweeted legal advice from former Fox Nation personalities Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, also known as Diamond and Silk, to support his unverified claims of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

The roughly four-minute clip shared by Trump shows Hardaway and Richardson insinuating voter fraud in an appearance on Newsmax. "Voter fraud is: impersonating people at the polls, false registrations, duplicate voting, fraudulent use of absentee ballots, buying votes, illegal assistance at the polls, ineligible voting like illegal aliens voting, dead people voting, altering the vote count, ballot petition fraud. Those are some of the fraudulent activities," Hardaway said.

The political personality went on to explain the difference between voter fraud and election fraud. "Election fraud is when you talk about the system, like the systems being used and how the votes are tabulated and how the vote was pulled from Donald Trump and given to Biden," she said.

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— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 29, 2020

In April, Fox News cut ties with Diamond and Silk—two pro-Trump vloggers who rose to prominence amid the 2016 election cycle—after they faced public outrage for spreading coronavirus disinformation. Over the past four years, the duo have hosted "Women United for Trump" events, appeared onstage at Trump campaign rallies and contributed weekly original content to Fox Nation, before the network sought distance from them.

Media reporters noticed that Diamond and Silk had not shared any new videos to Fox News since April 7, one day after they were briefly locked out of Twitter for encouraging their followers to flout stay-at-home orders put in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The duo has previously shared a number of conspiracy theories on Twitter and their YouTube channel. On March 30, they accused the media and health officials of inflating domestic coronavirus-related deaths to hurt Trump's reputation in a livestream.

"What I need to know is how many people have passed away in New York, and what I need to know is: Who has the bodies?" Hardaway asked. "I need for somebody that does investigative work to call the morgues. To call the funeral homes. We need to know, because I don't trust anything else... Something's not right here. Something is off here."

Richardson called the virus "man-made" and wondered if the World Health Organization had a "switch [to] turn this virus on and off."

On April 10, Diamond and Silk questioned whether "deep state snakes" were crafting 5G technology to infect people with coronavirus, pushing a prevalent conspiracy theory.

Newsweek reached out to the White House for comment.

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President Donald Trump arrives to speak in the Diplomatic Room of the White House on Thanksgiving on November 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. Erin Schaff/Getty