TYCO TRIAL: IT WASN'T 'OK' AFTER ALL

A juror in the Tyco case did not flash an OK sign to the defense during deliberations, NEWSWEEK has learned. Juror Glenn Andrews told NEWSWEEK that his fellow juror Ruth Jordan "did not do that. We talked about it. She does have this nervous tic and she fixes her hair all the time." The widely reported--but misinterpreted--gesture set off a firestorm that helped cause the collapse of the six-month trial of former Tyco CEO Dennis Kozlowski and ex-CFO Mark Swartz, accused of looting their company of $600 million. Prosecutors vow to retry the men.

The villain of the Tyco trial became Jordan, a former schoolteacher and lawyer who was in seclusion after the mistrial. She was demonized on the Internet after The Wall Street Journal and the New York Post identified her as the lone holdout. But Andrews says there was plenty of disagreement in the jury room. "You had 12 different backgrounds all clashing," he said. "The responsibility doesn't fall on one person." By Friday morning, though, the jury had coalesced and were "15 minutes" from convicting both men on several counts, says Andrews. Then Judge Michael Obus announced he was declaring a mistrial. Jordan had told him she'd received a threatening letter and was too terrified to go on. "People were crying," juror Gregory Sutton told NEWSWEEK. "We were so close to the end and then to have this happen was just devastating."

TYCO TRIAL: IT WASN'T 'OK' AFTER ALL | News
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