The United Nations Is Giving the Names of Uyghur Dissidents to China | Opinion

The Chinese government's violent oppression of the primarily Uyghur Muslim population in Xinjiang is no longer a secret. From forced sterilization of Uyghur women to the internment of millions in prison camps to the eradication and destruction of religious institutions, the Chinese Communist Party's actions against the Uyghurs have been deemed worthy of the name genocide to many in the human rights community.

Many—but not all. The United Nations, the very institution created to "reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights," is assisting China in its violent efforts to wipe out the Uyghurs by helping the CCP cover its tracks. These were the findings of a recent report in Le Monde about the efforts of UN human rights officer-turned whistleblower Emma Reilly. Reilly claims that prior to every UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) session in recent years, China has requested the names of Uyghur and other Chinese dissidents who were scheduled to speak. And despite this being explicitly forbidden by the UN's own rules, the UN, according to Reilly, has made it a practice to share this information with Chinese authorities, who use it to harass the dissidents' families who are still based in China.

Human Rights Lawyer Emma Reilly reveals that the UN is actively sharing the names of Uyghur dissidents with the Chinese Government, telling Maajid Nawaz the actions of the UN here are 'criminal.'@MaajidNawaz pic.twitter.com/tiaEVg5YVp

— LBC (@LBC) November 1, 2020

It's one thing for China to try to cover up its genocide; China boasts a long history of reprisals against human rights activists, Uyghurs included. But it's quite another thing for the body charged with protecting human rights to lend them a hand.

Reilly says she first discovered the practice in 2013, when China's Geneva delegation requested confirmation that certain "anti-government Chinese separatists" were set to speak at the Human Rights Council. Listed individuals included, among others, Dolkun Isa, current president of the World Uyghur Congress.

Le Monde reports that Reilly suggested that the request be rejected, just as the UN had rejected Turkish demands regarding Kurdish activists. But leaked emails appear to show Reilly's superior, Eric Tistounet, head of the Human Rights Council Branch of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), advising staffers that the names be shared with China because the meeting was public, and delaying sharing the names would merely "exacerbate the Chinese mistrust against us."

The UN in fact confirmed Reilly's allegations in 2017, when the OHCHR acknowledged that it confirms attendees' names with Chinese authorities who "regularly ask the UN Human Rights Office... whether particular NGO delegates are attending the forthcoming session." So too, did a 2019 UN tribunal confirm "the practice of providing names of human rights defenders to the Chinese delegation."

But while the UN has at times acknowledged this indefensible practice, it has simultaneously provided contradictory statements denying it. When asked about the allegations in March 2017, Tistounet dismissed them as "extreme right-wing" propaganda—a mere month after the OHCHR's admission that it did currently confirm Uyghur activists' names with China. Two months later, in a letter sent to UN Watch, the OHCHR asserted that it "does not confirm the names of individual activists accredited to attend UN Human Rights Council sessions to any State, and has not done so since at least 2015."

Uyghur protest
Members of the Muslim Uighur minority hold placards as they demonstrate to ask for news of their relatives and to express their concern about the ratification of an extradition treaty between China and Turkey at Uskudar square in Istanbul on February 26, 2021. - Chinese parliament ratified on December 26, 2020 an extradition treaty signed in 2017 with Ankara, a text that Beijing wants to use in particular to speed up the return of certain Muslim Uighurs suspected of "terrorism" and who are refugees in Turkey. Yasin AKGUL / AFP/Getty Images

Then, in an August 2017 letter to Human Rights Watch, High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein acknowledged that the UN "often receives communications from... China" with a list of individuals who the Chinese claim "represent possible threats to the United Nations." Once UN security services determine the allegations are baseless, wrote Al Hussein, China is informed that its concerns are unfounded, and "no other information is transmitted to the State." A UN judge, however, rejected Al Hussein's assertions in 2020, stating that in 2017, the "OHCHR misrepresented the practice of giving names to a Member State's delegation to 'Human Rights Watch.'"

Alarmingly, UN Secretary-General António Guterres is aware of the allegations; in 2018, his office ordered Al Hussein to "resolve" the dispute with Reilly, Le Monde revealed. And yet, since objecting to the practice in 2013, Reilly says she has been ostracized and "publicly defamed," her career "left in tatters." And despite being recognized as a whistleblower in 2020, she was fired the day after the Le Monde story's publication.

What Reilly's reports reveal is that the UN is more concerned with appeasing China than with combatting the Chinese-led Uyghur genocide. China, meanwhile, continues to retaliate against Uyghur activists. In a 2019 witness statement regarding the OHCHR sharing his name with China, a Uyghur dissident, Dolkun Isa, revealed that he didn't know where his 90-year-old father was, or if he was even alive. His mother died in a Chinese detention center in 2018, aged 78.

Shockingly, world leaders are also aware of the practice. In 2019, UN Watch Executive Director, Hillel Neuer, sent letters to the Geneva delegations of the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Canada, Netherlands, France, Germany, and Sweden, detailing instances of Chinese dissidents' names (some of whom are citizens of Western nations) being shared by the UN. Citing China's history of retaliating against human rights activists, Neuer explained that "providing China or any other government with names of dissidents accredited to attend UN sessions in advance of the sessions is harmful and potentially life-threatening to dissidents and their families, particularly family members still in China."

Not one country responded to Neuer.

Dutch parliament too, is well-aware. In a January 2019 letter to Dutch lawmakers, Foreign Minister Stef Blok noted both the OHCHR and UN Ethics Office's admissions that the UN hands Chinese authorities "lists of names" of Chinese dissidents set to speak at the UNHRC. World leaders, however, have refused to confront this abomination.

For years and with total impunity, UN officials have aided China in covering up one of the greatest human rights atrocities of our generation. It's high time for world leaders to press the UN for answers and bring those responsible for such an abject betrayal of the UN's guiding principles to justice. History won't judge them kindly for turning a blind eye.

Josh Feldman is an Australian writer. Twitter: @joshrfeldman.

The views in this article are the writer's own.