U.S.

One in Five Republicans Believes a Multiethnic Society Has a Negative Impact on the U.S.

One in five Republicans believes a multi-ethnic U.S. population has had a negative impact on the country’s culture, a new survey reveals.

According to a new Pew Research Center survey, 21 percent of Republicans or voters leaning toward the Republican Party said having different races and ethnicities in the U.S. population was a negative.

One in two Republicans considers a multi-ethnic society a positive, while 29 percent of respondents believe it doesn’t make a difference.

Only 5 percent of Democrats believe a population made up of people from different ethnicities and races has had a negative impact on the country’s culture, with 17 percent saying it made no difference.

The remaining 77 percent sees a multi-ethnic and racially diverse society as a positive for the U.S.

The divide between Republicans and Democrats is even more marked when it comes to outlooks on community diversity. According to the survey, 80 percent of Republican voters in the least diverse neighborhoods are satisfied with the amount of racial diversity in their communities.

The percentage drops to 51 among Democrats, with 45 percent of Democratic voters saying they would like to see more racially mixed communities. By contrast, the figure drops to 12 percent among Republican voters.

Different demographics also play a major role in how Americans feel about racial diversity. Among respondents between 18 and 29 years old, 45 percent wanted to see a more racially diverse community, by far the highest percentage among all demographics.

The figure dropped to 29 and 14 percent for the 30-49 and 50-64 age groups, respectively, while 20 percent of those over 65 also indicated they would like to see more diverse communities.

In the latter category, 73 percent of the respondents said they were happy with the current composition of their local community, a figure that rose to 79 percent among people between the ages of 50 and 64.

Among those in the 30-49 age group, 63 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with the diversity in their community, an opinion shared by 43 percent of people between the ages of 18 and 29.

Meanwhile, 29 percent of Americans admitted they would be bothered to some extent if they heard people speaking a language other than English. Demographic and political views again had an impact on the responses, with 21 percent of respondents over 65 suggesting they would be very bothered by hearing someone speak a different language.

By contrast, the figure dropped to 6 percent among people between 18 and 29 years old, and to 9 percent among those in the 30-49 age group.

Among Democrats, 6 percent said they would be really bothered by it and 12 percent said they would be bothered to some extent, compared with 20 percent and 27 percent among Republicans.

Times Square People pose for a photo in front of a US National Flag displayed in Times Square in New York on August 20, 2018. According to a new Pew Research Center survey, 21 percent of Republicans or voters leaning toward the Republican Party said having different races and ethnicities in the U.S. population was a negative. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

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