U.S. States Where Coronavirus Cases Are Rising Fastest

New cases of the novel coronavirus in the U.S. continue to soar, approaching 4.3 million, as of Tuesday. Mississippi, Missouri, Alaska, Oklahoma and Tennessee are among the states where new infections have been rising the fastest in the country, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

As of Tuesday, Mississippi, Missouri, Alaska, Oklahoma and Tennessee are the top five states that have seen the largest upward trend of new cases over the past two weeks, based on the three-day rolling average of daily new cases per 100,000 people, according to the latest report Tuesday by the university.

Here we take a closer look at these states and their worst-hit local areas. Case data below is from Johns Hopkins University, unless otherwise stated.

Mississippi

The three-day rolling average of daily new cases in Mississippi has been mostly increasing on a sharp incline over roughly the past two weeks. It rose from 707.67 on July 13 and peaked at 1,478 on July 21, before dropping to 1,065.33 on July 26, according to the report.

The state's worst-hit county is Hinds County, home to Jackson (the state capital and most populous city), with 4,642 cases.

Mississippi's stay-at-home order ended on June 1, after which all businesses were allowed to reopen with strict guidelines in place. Restaurants, gyms, barbershops, and salons were reopened in May with limitations.

Earlier this month, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves announced a pause on all efforts to reopen the economy following the recent surge in new cases.

Missouri

Missouri's three-day rolling average of daily new cases has mostly increased over the past two weeks. It spiked from 544.67 on July 13 to 1,284.67 on July 26. The figure peaked at 1,512 new cases on July 24, according to Johns Hopkins University's report.

St. Louis County has the most cases, with 11,152 confirmed infections, according to the latest report Tuesday by Missouri's state health department.

Missouri's stay-at-home order was issued back in April. The state entered phase two of reopening on June 16. "During Phase 2, there will be no statewide health order. All statewide restrictions will be lifted, though local officials will still have the authority to put further rules, regulations, or ordinances in place," the office of Missouri Gov. Michael L. Parson confirmed in a statement.

Alaska

The three-day rolling average of daily new cases in Alaska rose on a steep upward trend over the past 14 days, with 64.67 reported on July 13 and peaking to 125 on July 26, according to the latest report Tuesday by Johns Hopkins University.

The municipality of Anchorage is the worst-hit local area of the state, which has 1,402 total confirmed cases to date, according to the latest figures reported by Johns Hopkins University.

Alaska issued a series of health mandates in a bid to reduce the spread of infection. The state began its fourth phase of reopening on May 22, which saw all businesses, recreational and sports activities, houses of worship, libraries and museums, resume operations.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma's three-day rolling average of daily new cases has been mostly rising over the past two weeks, spiking from 653.67 on July 13 to a peak of 1,190 on July 26. The figure dipped from July 15 before seeing a dramatic increase from 423 new cases on July 20 to 1,190 on July 26, according to the latest report Tuesday from the university.

Oklahoma County, home to the state capital of Oklahoma City, is the worst-hit county, with 8,019 confirmed cases, followed by Tulsa County, with 7,912 cases to date, according to the latest figures from the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

Oklahoma's stay-at-home order was extended to May 6 but some businesses were allowed to reopen from April 24 with restrictions, including dining and entertainment venues and personal care services. Earlier this month, the city council for Oklahoma City issued a mandatory mask ordinance, which is in effect until September 8.

Tulsa Oklahoma, Trump rally June 2020
Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump at a campaign rally at the BOK Center, June 20, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Getty Images

Tennessee

Tennessee's three-day rolling average of daily new cases has seen several spikes over the past two weeks. The average rose from 1,927.33 on July 13 and peaked at 2,470 on July 26, according to the latest report Tuesday from the university.

Shelby County is the state's worst-hit region, with 18,654 confirmed cases, followed by Davidson County, which has 18,136 cases to date, according to the latest figures from the university.

Most businesses in Tennessee reopened from May 1 when the stay-at-home order was lifted. Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee noted: "These businesses will open according to specific guidance that we will provide in accordance with state and national experts in both medicine and business."

Over 16.5 million people across the globe have been infected since the virus was first reported in Wuhan, China, including over 4.2 million in the U.S. More than 9.6 million globally have reportedly recovered from infection, while over 654,800 have died, as of Tuesday, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

The graphics below, provided by Statista, illustrate the spread of COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

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