USDA Recalls More Than 2,800 Pounds of Veal and Lamb Products That Failed to Go Through Inspection

A recall notice has been issued for 2,804 pounds of veal and lamb products after food safety officials became aware they had bypassed the standard import re-inspection process.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced a Class I recall affecting meat produced by the Canadian company Montpak International Inc. on December 19.

According to the notice, the products entered the U.S. on December 4 when they were shipped to distributors in the states of New Jersey, New York and Virginia.

The affected meat can be identified by the establishment number "CANADA 96," which is located on the Canadian mark of inspection on the label, or by the code "EST 1809," which is found on the box, and include:

  • 40-pound bulk boxes containing "VEAL Bones" with a SKU 97507U and PRODUCT OF CANADA ("CANADA 96" in the Canadian mark of inspection) represented on the label.
  • 50-pound bulk boxes containing "VEAL Marrow bones" with a SKU 97660U and PRODUCT OF CANADA ("CANADA 96" in the Canadian mark of inspection) represented on the label
  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing "MECHANICALLY TENDERIZED VEAL LEG CUTLET 2 OZ CHUNKS" and EST 1809 and PACKED ON DEC-10-19 represented on the label
  • 10-pound bulk boxes containing "MECHANICALLY TENDERIZED VEAL LEG CUTLET 2 OZ EYE RND" and EST 1809 and PACKED ON DEC-10-19 represented on the label
  • Whole carcasses of lamb wrapped in cheese cloth

There appear to be no reports of any health problems from eating the meat as of yet but the USDA has warned there is a high risk and recommends anyone in possession of the products listed in the notice throw them away.

"These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase," the USDA warns. "Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider."

Raw Meat
The USDA has recalled more than 2,800 pounds of raw meat after it failed to undergo import inspection. Bledger/iStock

The federal government estimates there are around 48 million cases of food poisoning in the U.S. each year.

Red meat and poultry are two of the most common culprits and can harbor some of the most dangerous types of foodborne bacteria, including E. coli, salmonella and listeria.

To avoid sickness, the U.S. Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) advises people ensure the meat is thoroughly cooked and stick leftovers in a refrigerator 40°F or cooler within two hours of preparation. Meat and poultry should not be washed in case it contaminates other surfaces—in spite of what some older recipes might say.

USDA Recalls More Than 2,800 Pounds of Veal and Lamb Products That Failed to Go Through Inspection | Health