U.S.

Where Do I Vote? Midterm Election 2018 Polling Places and Early Voting Information

The midterm elections will take place Tuesday, with Democrats, Republicans and nonpartisan organizations alike urging Americans to vote in order in one of the most heated election cycles in recent history.

Midterm elections are held halfway between presidential elections. One-third of Senate seats and all 435 seats of the House of Representatives are up for grabs. In addition, 36 state governors and three U.S. territory governors and many city mayors are on the ballot.

Voters should contact their state or territorial election offices to find out polling places and hours. A locator can be found on USA.gov’s website: www.usa.gov/election-office. Polling locations are assigned to voters based on their residential address. Voters should not go to a polling location they are not assigned to because their names will not be on the roster. Checking before going to vote is important because assigned polling locations could change from previous elections.

Anyone who goes to vote at a polling place other than the one assigned will be forced to cast a provisional ballot, which will only be counted after the voter’s eligibility is confirmed.

Vote.org has a polling place locator on its website: www.vote.org/polling-place-locator. Rock the Vote, a nonpartisan nonprofit that was established in the 1990s by music executives to encourage young people to vote, has a “find your polling place” page that allows visitors to enter their address to find locations to vote as well as information on candidates.

Voters with disabilities can vote at accessible polling places but must make a request ahead of time.

Alternatives to voting at a polling location on November 6 include voting by mail and going through the early voting process in states that offer it. The National Conference of State Legislatures provides a list of the 37 states and the District of Columbia that offer early voting and the deadlines, which generally range from several days before the election to the day of the election.  

USA.gov can answer election questions at 844-872-4681.

Democrats and Republicans, including President Donald Trump, have in recent weeks engaged in massive efforts to encourage constituents to vote. Republicans seek to retain majorities in the House and Senate. The party of the president traditionally loses ground in the midterms, and they are often considered a referendum on the individual in the White House.

Trump has held many rallies to stump for GOP candidates, explicitly making the elections about him. The votes could have huge ramifications for the president personally, with Democratic control of the House having the potential to lead to his impeachment.

“It is outrageous what the Democrats are doing to our Country. Vote Republican now! http://Vote.GOP,” Trump tweeted on Wednesday and pinned it to his Twitter page.

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