White House Reporter Who Has COVID Says He Had No Contact Tracing From Trump Administration

New York Times White House correspondent Michael Shear says the Trump administration hasn't reached out to him following a positive test for COVID-19, despite the need for contact tracing.

Shear, who is a political analyst for CNN, told the network's John Berman on Monday that the White House had not made contact with him since his diagnosis. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump have also tested positive.

"Ten days, 11 days, whatever since I think I was probably infected on that Saturday, I've not been contacted by the White House," Shear said. "Nobody from the White House has said boo and asked anything about where I was or who I talked to or who else I might have infected."

"So I think that that just shows you, you know, that they're not taking it seriously, at least as it pertains to themselves," Shear told Berman.

Berman explained that Trump spoke to reporters on Saturday and asked if the president was wearing a mask.

"He was not," Shear said. "He was not wearing a mask and he spoke to us for about 10 minutes off the record."

"Look, it's hard to know, right, if he'd just been infected himself that day. The medical experts, I think, that you guys have been playing would suggest that he probably wasn't very infective himself at that point."

Shear went on to say he had taken a COVID test as required before getting on Air Force One and it was possible he ran into someone else at the White House who infected him.

Trump announced his diagnosis on Twitter late on Thursday and was moved to Walter Reed Medical Center the following day. However, there has been confusion about when he knew he had COVID and the state of his health.

Shear earlier told The Washington Post that there was an "element of risk" in his job, saying: "There are some things the White House could have done to minimize the risk more."

During the same CNN broadcast, host John Berman criticized the differing information coming from the president's physician, Dr. Sean Conley, and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.

"The one thing we now know for certain is that politics is superseding medicine here," Berman said. "When Dr. Conley lies on Saturday and then gleefully admits to lying on Sunday, you know that politics has taken precedent."

President Trump Leaves the White House
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. The White House has been accused of not reaching out to an infected reporter. Drew Angerer/Getty Images