White Ohio Man Calls Man N-Word Repeatedly in Work Van, Gets Caught on Video, Apologizes

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A screenshot from the video of an apparent incident in which a white man repeatedly called a black man the N-word after following him in a work van. Screenshot / Twitter video Shaun King

Video of a white man in Ohio repeatedly calling a black man the N-word from his work van has gained traction online Wednesday. Activist and writer Shaun King shared video of the incident to Twitter, posting "ALL HANDS ON DECK."

The video appears to show pretty blatant racist language. "Is there a reason why you just followed me to my house," the person who seems to be taking the video asks.

After some back and forth that is difficult to hear, a white man says from the work van—which clearly shows the company name and phone number—"I just want to let you know what a [expletive] you are."

The man who recorded the video has been identified as Charles Lovett, from Columbus, Ohio, according to a report from WSYX/WTTE. Lovett is black. The white man in the video has been identified as Jeffrey Whitman, owner of Uriah's Heating and Cooling in Central Ohio, reported WSYX/WTTE. The incident reportedly happened on Tuesday morning.

The video goes on for three and a half minutes. The two men apparently had some kind of incident on the roadway and a turn lane. Lovett remains calm throughout while Whitman uses the N-word on multiple occasions. He calls Lovett a "rude [n-word]" and says he lives "in the rude world."

Whitman sent a lengthy apology in a statement to WSYX/WTTE in which he apparently admits to using the racist language. It read:

"I apologize for my use of the n word towards Charles Lovett on Tuesday, July 24th. I understand that using the n-word was not only hurtful towards Lovett as an individual, but hurtful towards the Black community at large. Using the word was dehumanizing, unacceptable, and inexcusable. My actions reflect an unhealthy mindset I have developed and I need to work to change. I have served the Black community for the last 9 years, installing furnaces and water heaters with pride. My actions that day are not a reflection of my feelings towards the Black community. I also understand that racial tensions in America are higher than before, and I regret my part in contributing to that tension. I realize that words are hollow without action, and because of the hurt I have caused, I hope I have the opportunity to give back to the Black community that I have harmed in a meaningful way."

White Ohio Man Calls Man N-Word Repeatedly in Work Van, Gets Caught on Video, Apologizes | U.S.