Who Is Mark Meadows? GOP Congressman Officially Resigns to Become White House Chief of Staff

Republican North Carolina Representative Mark Meadows tendered his resignation from Congress Monday in order to become the new White House Chief of Staff.

Meadows replaces acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney who will become the U.S. envoy to Northern Ireland.

"Serving the people of North Carolina's eleventh congressional district for these last seven years has been the honor of my life," Meadows wrote Monday in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. "I will forever be grateful for the opportunity."

"I am pleased to announce that Congressman Mark Meadows will become White House Chief of Staff," President Donald Trump tweeted in March. "I have long known and worked with Mark, and the relationship is a very good one...."

I am pleased to announce that Congressman Mark Meadows will become White House Chief of Staff. I have long known and worked with Mark, and the relationship is a very good one....

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 7, 2020

Meadows served nearly four terms as a North Carolina representative. According to Meadows' website, he "has been a known champion for fiscal responsibility, accountable government, pro-growth economic policies, pro-family and pro-life initiatives, and a strong military."

mark meadows
Former North Carolina Representative Mark Meadows resigned Monday to become the new White House Chief of Staff. Getty

In a statement sent to Newsweek, North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Michael Whatley said, "Mark Meadows has been a conservative force during his tenure in the United States House of Representatives, where he has fought every day for his constituents."

"On behalf of the entire North Carolina Republican Party, I would like to congratulate Mark on his new position in the Trump Administration and to thank him for his service to the 11th District and North Carolina," Whatley continued.

Meadows is one of the founders of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of staunch Republicans within the House of Representatives currently chaired by Arizona Representative Andy Biggs.

When Trump shut down portions of the federal government in 2019 during partisan squabbling over the funding for the wall between the U.S and Mexico, Meadows stood firmly on the president's side.

"We are going to back up the president," Meadows told the House in December 2019. "If he vetoes this bill, we will be there. But, more importantly, the American people will be there. They will be there to support him. Let's build the wall and make sure that we do our job in Congress."

That shutdown ended after three weeks, with resolutions signed continuing to fund the government while not leaving Trump with the money for border security he had requested.

Meadows was also part of the "birther" movement, which doubted the veracity of President Barack Obama's U.S. citizenship. In June 2012, Meadows told attendees at the Blue Ridge Tea Party Patriots Congressional Candidate Forum that he would "send [Obama] back home to Kenya or wherever it is. We'll send him back home."

In December, Meadows announced he would not seek reelection to Congress. "I'm going to be working closer with the president, not less so," Meadows told Roll Call at the time. "Without getting into any specifics, I've had ongoing conversations with the president about helping with his team in a closer environment. And I felt like it would be disingenuous to file and then resign at some point in the future and leave my district searching for a nominee."