World Press Photo of the Year 2019 Contest Nominees

WPP
World Press Photo of the Year

The nominees for the World Press Photo of the Year contest have been announced. Now in its 62nd year, the competition honors photojournalists who have captured images that manage to encapsulate the year, or represent an issue, situation or event of great journalistic importance, while demonstrating an outstanding level of visual perception and creativity.

Women make up 32% of the nominees this year, a significant increase from the 2018 Photo Contest, when just 12% of the nominees were female photographers.

In addition to the main prize for the best single image, there is also a prize for the best photo story. Further awards are made in eight categories: General News, Spot News, Environment, Nature, Contemporary Issues, Portraits, Sports and Long-Term Projects.

The winners will be announced on April 11. Until then, Newsweek presents the nominees for the 2019 World Press Photo of the Year contest, starting with the six nominees for the press photo of the year, then looking at each of the categories, before ending with photo stories.

The nominees for the World Press Photo of the Year:

Crying Girl on the Border, John Moore, Getty Images

01 005_John Moore_Getty Images
Yana, from Honduras, cries as her mother Sandra Sanchez is searched by a US Border Patrol agent, in McAllen, Texas, USA, on June 12. © John Moore, Getty Images

Immigrant families had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by the authorities. Yana (who was approaching her second birthday) and her mother had been part of a refugee caravan that started its journey in southern Mexico in April. On 6 April, the US Attorney General Jeff Sessions had announced a 'zero tolerance' immigration policy, stating that people caught entering the US illegally would be criminally prosecuted. Soon afterwards, news outlets began to report that parents who had been apprehended were being separated from their children. Yana's father, still in Honduras, later made it clear that Yana and Sandra had not been parted. Nevertheless, public outcry—in which this image played a role—resulted in President Donald Trump halting family separations on 20 June.

Akashinga—The Brave Ones, Brent Stirton, Getty Images

02 006_Brent Stirton_Getty Images
Petronella Chigumbura (30), a member of an all-female anti-poaching unit called Akashinga, participates in stealth and concealment training in the Phundundu Wildlife Park, Zimbabwe. © Brent Stirton, Getty Images

Akashinga ('The Brave Ones') is a ranger force established as an alternative conservation model. It aims to work with, rather than against local populations, for the long-term benefits of their communities and the environment. Akashinga comprises women from disadvantaged backgrounds, empowering them, offering jobs, and helping local people to benefit directly from the preservation of wildlife. Other strategies—such as using fees from trophy hunting to fund conservation—have been criticized for imposing solutions from the outside and excluding the needs of local people.

Victims of an Alleged Gas Attack Receive Treatment in Eastern Ghouta, Mohammed Badra, European Pressphoto Agency

03 001_Mohammed Badra_European Pressphoto Agency
A man and a child receive treatment after the suspected gas attack on al-Shifunieh, February 25, 2018. © Mohammed Badra, European Pressphoto Agency

By February 2018, the people of Eastern Ghouta, a suburban district outside Damascus and one of the last rebel enclaves in the ongoing Syrian conflict, had been under siege by government forces for five years. During the final offensive, Eastern Ghouta came under rocket fire and air bombardment, including at least one alleged gas attack—on the village of al-Shifunieh, on 25 February 2018. Figures are difficult to verify, but Médecins Sans Frontiѐres (MSF) reported 4,829 wounded and 1,005 killed between 18 February and 3 March 2018, according to data from medical facilities they supported alone. MSF also reported 13 hospitals and clinics damaged or destroyed in just three days. Reports on the end of the siege in Eastern Ghouta are conflicting, though the Syrian army appear to have recaptured most of the south of the country by July. UNICEF reported the siege of Eastern Ghouta to have ended by late-March, with limited humanitarian access becoming available.

Being Pregnant After FARC Child-Bearing Ban, Catalina Martin-Chico, Panos

04 003_Catalina Martin-Chico_Panos
Yorladis is pregnant for the sixth time, after five other pregnancies were terminated during her FARC years. She says she managed to hide the fifth pregnancy from her commander until the sixth month by wearing loose clothes © Catalina Martin-Chico, Panos

Since the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel movement in 2016, there has been a baby boom among former female guerillas. Pregnancy was thought incompatible with guerrilla life. Women were obliged to put war before children, leaving babies with relatives or, some say, undergoing forced abortions—a charge FARC denies.

Almajiri Boy, Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto

05 002_Marco Gualazzini_Contrasto
An orphaned boy walks past a wall with drawings depicting rocket-propelled grenade launchers, in Bol, Chad. © Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto

A humanitarian crisis is underway in the Chad Basin, caused by a complex combination of political conflict and environmental factors. Lake Chad—once one of Africa's largest lakes and a lifeline to 40 million people—is experiencing massive desertification. As a result of unplanned irrigation, extended drought, deforestation and resource mismanagement, the size of the lake has decreased by 90 percent over the past 60 years. Traditional livelihoods such as fishing have withered, and water shortages are causing conflict between farmers and cattle herders. Jihadist group Boko Haram, which is active in the area, both benefits from the hardship and widespread hunger and contributes to it. The group uses local villages as a recruiting ground, and the protracted conflict has uprooted 2.5 million people, exacerbating food insecurity.

The Disappearance of Jamal Kashoggi, Chris McGrath, Getty Images

06 004_Chris McGrath_Getty Images
An unidentified man tries to hold back the press on 15 October, as Saudi investigators arrive at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, amid a growing international backlash to the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. © Chris McGrath, Getty Images

A critic of the Saudi regime, Khashoggi had been missing since entering the consulate on 2 October to obtain documents. After weeks of rumor and false information, Riyadh announced that Khashoggi had been killed accidentally during an altercation. Turkish authorities and the CIA claimed he had been murdered by Saudi intelligence operatives, working under high Saudi authority.

The nominees for General News single image:

050_Brendan Smialowski_Agence France-Presse
President Donald Trump leads France’s President Emmanuel Macron by the hand while walking to the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington DC, on 24 April 2018. © Brendan Smialowski, Agence France-Presse
049_Chris McGrath_Getty Images
An unidentified man tries to hold back the press on 15 October, as Saudi investigators arrive at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, amid a growing international backlash to the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. © Chris McGrath, Getty Images
051_Daniele Volpe
The living-room of an abandoned home in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala, lies covered in ash after the eruption of Volcán de Fuego on 3 June 2018. © Daniele Volpe

The nominees for Spot News single image:

135_Pedro Pardo_Agence France-Presse
Central American migrants climb the border fence between Mexico and the United States, near El Chaparral border crossing, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, on 25 November 2018. © Pedro Pardo, Agence France-Presse
133_Ezra Acayan
The body of Michael Nadayao lies in the street after he was shot dead by unidentified men in front of mourners at a wake, in Quezon City, Philippines, on 31 August 2018. © Ezra Acayan
134_John Moore_Getty Images
Yana, from Honduras, cries as her mother Sandra Sanchez is searched by a US Border Patrol agent, in McAllen, Texas, USA, on 12 June 2018. © John Moore, Getty Images

The nominees for Environment single image:

034_Mário Cruz
A child who collects recyclable material lies on a mattress surrounded by garbage floating on the Pasig River, in Manila, Philippines. © Mário Cruz
035_Wally Skalij_Los Angeles Times
Evacuated horses stand tied to a pole, as smoke from a wildfire billows above them, on Zuma Beach, in Malibu, California, USA, on November 10. © Wally Skalij, Los Angeles Times
036_Brent Stirton_Getty Images
Petronella Chigumbura (30), a member of an all-female anti-poaching unit called Akashinga, participates in stealth and concealment training in the Phundundu Wildlife Park, Zimbabwe. © Brent Stirton, Getty Images

The nominees for Nature single image:

088_Jasper Doest
A Caribbean flamingo inspects the improvised socks created to help heal its severe foot lesions, at the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben, Curaçao. © Jasper Doest
089_Angel Fitor
A winged comb jelly, Leucothea multicornis, its wings widely opened, propels itself through waters off Alicante, Spain. © Angel Fitor
090_Bence Máté
Frogs with their legs severed and surrounded by frogspawn struggle to the surface, after being thrown back into the water in Covasna, Eastern Carpathians, Romania, in April 2018. © Bence Máté

The nominees for Contemporary Issues single image:

019_Enayat Asadi
An Afghan refugee comforts his companion while waiting for transport across the eastern border of Iran, on 27 July. © Enayat Asadi
020_Mary F Calvert
Former US marine Ethan Hanson bathes at home in Austin, Minnesota, USA, after a sexual trauma experienced during his military service left him unable to take showers. © Mary F. Calvert
021_Diana Markosian_Magnum Photos
Pura rides around her neighborhood in a pink 1950s convertible, as the community gathers to celebrate her fifteenth birthday, in Havana, Cuba. © Diana Markosian, Magnum Photos

The nominees for Portrait single image:

103_Heba Khamis
Jochen (71) and Mohamed (21; not his real name) sit in the Tiergarten, Berlin. Jochen fell in love after meeting Mohamed, then a sex worker in the park. They have been dating for 19 months. © Heba Khamis
104_Alyona Kochetkova
Alyona Kochetkova sits at home, unable to face borscht (beet soup), her favorite food, during treatment for cancer. © Alyona Kochetkova
105_Finbarr O_Reilly
Diarra Ndiaye, Ndeye Fatou Mbaye and Malezi Sakho model outfits by designer Adama Paris, in the Medina neighborhood of the Senegalese capital, Dakar, as curious residents look on. © Finbarr O'Reilly

The nominees for Sports single image:

118_David Gray_Reuters
Naomi Osaka serves during her match against Simona Halep from Romania during the Australian Open tennis tournament, at Margaret Court Arena, Melbourne, Australia, on January 22. © David Gray, Reuters
119_Terrell Groggins
Olympic champion Claressa Shields (right) meets Hanna Gabriels in a boxing match at the Masonic Temple in Detroit, Michigan, USA, on June 22. © Terrell Groggins
120_John T Pedersen
Boxer Morin Ajambo (30) trains in Katanga, a large slum settlement in Kampala, Uganda, on March 24. © John T. Pedersen

The nominees for Long Term Projects:

Beckon Us From Home, Sarah Blesener

068_Sarah Blesener
Gilbert (13) practices house-searching drill with the Wisconsin Army Cadets, in Appleton, Wisconsin, USA. © Sarah Blesener
067_Sarah Blesener
Students undergo firearms training using airguns at Borodino, the battleground where Russia fought Napoleon’s forces in 1812. © Sarah Blesener

State of Decay, Alejandro Cegarra

073_Alejandro Cegarra
Demonstrators with homemade shields at an anti-Maduro protest, Caracas, 7 July 2017. © Alejandro Cegarra

The House That Bleeds, Yael Martínez

080_Yael Martínez
Digno Cruz cries at home in Taxco, Guerrero, while talking about his missing grandsons. © Yael Martínez
086_Yael Martínez
Photos of 14-year-old Perla Granda’s missing brothers adorn her bedroom wall. The photographer’s sister-in-law lives with her mother and surviving sister. © Yael Martínez

The three nominees for the World Press Photo Story of the Year:

The Lake Chad Crisis, Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto

009_Marco Gualazzini_Contrasto
Ababakar Mbomi, an anti-Jihad activist in Melea, Chad, was shot 11 times when Boko Haram tried to kidnap his wife in 2014. © Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto
008_Marco Gualazzini_Contrasto
Men punt a pirogue through marshy cane thicket at the lake’s edge. © Marco Gualazzini, Contrasto

A humanitarian crisis is underway in the Chad Basin, caused by a complex combination of political conflict and environmental factors. Lake Chad—once one of Africa's largest lakes and a lifeline to 40 million people—is experiencing massive desertification. As a result of unplanned irrigation, extended drought, deforestation and resource mismanagement, the size of the lake has decreased by 90 percent over the past 60 years. Traditional livelihoods such as fishing have withered, and water shortages are causing conflict between farmers and cattle herders. Jihadist group Boko Haram, which is active in the area, both benefits from the hardship and widespread hunger and contributes to it. The group uses local villages as a recruiting ground, and the protracted conflict has uprooted 2.5 million people, exacerbating food insecurity.

The Migrant Caravan, Pieter Ten Hoopen, Agence Vu/Civilian Act

014_Pieter Ten Hoopen_Agence Vu_Civilian Act
A girl pick flowers during the day’s walk from Tapanatepec to Niltepec, a distance of 50 km. © Pieter Ten Hoopen, Agence Vu/Civilian Act
012_Pieter Ten Hoopen_Agence Vu_Civilian Act
Families bathe, wash clothes and relax beside the Rio Novillero, when the caravan takes a rest day near Tapanatepec. © Pieter Ten Hoopen, Agence Vu/Civilian Act

During October and November 2018, thousands of Central American refugees joined a caravan heading to the United States border. The caravan, assembled through a grassroots social media campaign, left San Pedro Sula, Honduras, on 12 October 2018, and as word spread drew people from Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. They were a mix of those facing political repression and violence, and those fleeing harsh economic conditions in the hope of a better life. Traveling in a caravan offered a degree of safety on a route where migrants have previously disappeared or been kidnapped, and was an alternative to paying high rates to people smugglers.

Migrant caravans travel to the US border at different times each year, but this was the largest in recent memory with as many as 7,000 travelers, including at least 2,300 children, according to UN agencies. Conditions along the way were grueling, with people walking around 30 km a day, often in temperatures above 30℃. The caravan usually set off at around 4am each day to avoid the heat. Like others, this caravan drew condemnation from US president Donald Trump, who made it a focal point of rallies and used it to reiterate his call for tough immigration policies and the building of a border wall.

Yemen Crisis, Lorenzo Tugnoli, Contrasto, for The Washington Post

017_Lorenzo Tugnoli_Contrasto_for The Washington
A militiaman stands in a frontline position outside the besieged city of Taiz, on 26 November. Aid and supplies could be delivered to the city only along a road under control of the Saudi coalition. © Lorenzo Tugnoli, Contrasto, for The Washington Post
015_Lorenzo Tugnoli_Contrasto_for The Washington Post
A woman begs outside a grocery store in Azzan, a pivotal southern crossroads town that had seesawed back and forth between government and insurgent forces, on 22 May. © Lorenzo Tugnoli, Contrasto, for The Washington Post

After nearly four years of conflict in Yemen, at least 8.4 million people are at risk of starvation and 22 million people—75% of the population—are in need of humanitarian assistance, according to the UN. In 2014, Houthi Shia Muslim rebels seized northern areas of the country, forcing the president, Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, into exile. The conflict spread, and escalated when Saudi Arabia, in coalition with eight other mostly Sunni Arab states, began air strikes against the Houthis. By 2018, the war had led to what the UN termed the world's worst man-made humanitarian disaster.